shaun

Jun 042022
 

While we wait for more insulation PU foam boards to come from the scrap material merchant, we got on with the next task to do, to get the walls insulated and boarded on our various Hallways on the Ground floor. But, before we can cover up everything, we need to install all the conduits and pipes that needs to go upstairs or up to the hall ceilings.

To aid in this task, we decided that the Cloakroom and Linen cupboard would have their floors built so we could route any pipes etc underneath. We did our usual procedure of using the green laser level to give us the height of the flooring, nailed the framework around and across the floor and cut to size loose 22mm chipboard floorboards.
The floorboards are not glued or screwed down so we can lift them up easily for doing our routing of any Utility pipes, ducting or conduits.

One of the first utility we did was the vacuum ducting pipework, to extend the capability of providing a vacuum cleaning service upstairs. It was going up inside the wall just right of the Cloakroom sliding door module and it needed two junctions at the top, one for the “port” for the mini hallway upstairs and a second pipe run going off to the work room to provide local vacuum facilities for plugging into various machinery. Each junction needed two 45° fittings joined together to make the right angle turn. We wanted to have more gentle turns so we avoid encountering blockages hidden inside the network somewhere. But having two 45° units fitted together, they are quite bulky so we had to wiggle, twist and trim down various joints before we had our solution.

Installing All Conduits and Pipes to Serve the Upper Floor from Hallway's Services

Complicated-vacuum-pipe-junction

Installing All Conduits and Pipes to Serve the Upper Floor from Hallway's Services

From-the-joint

Installing All Conduits and Pipes to Serve the Upper Floor from Hallway's Services

Vacuum-pipe-for-upstairs-hall

Installing All Conduits and Pipes to Serve the Upper Floor from Hallway's Services

And-down-the-hall-towards-the-utility



But we did realise that we had missed a shorter connection, to provide a port for upstairs in the workshop room. We already had a vacuum port downstairs next to the Utility Room, on the end wall of the hallway! So, we made some adjustments and removed a long straight section. Then we extended the new location upwards instead, making it come out upstairs that will be the workshop.
Installing All Conduits and Pipes to Serve the Upper Floor from Hallway's Services

Shorter-route-to-Work-3

Installing All Conduits and Pipes to Serve the Upper Floor from Hallway's Services

Vacuum-branch-sealed-off



The other location for another vacuum port is all the way down next to the Great Room entrance so that we can plug in the hose and do any cleaning jobs in the Kitchen, Bedroom One, or indeed the Great room too.
Installing All Conduits and Pipes to Serve the Upper Floor from Hallway's Services

Vacuum-port-for-Great-room-and-Kitchen


We also bought some adapters, to reduce the 50mm diameter down to the 40mm size because we discovered that the manufactured “pretty” vacuum port themselves can plug straight into a 40mm socket without any other items or adapters.
We now have three ports downstairs (plus another one to do across the Great Room near the Conservatory later on) and two upstairs minimum and maybe a third one for connecting to various equipment like a band saw or drill press in the workshop.

Then, the next utility to deal with, is the compressed air supply. We inserted a 22mm plumbing pipe up near the cloakroom and ran a line all the way down the hall up in the ceiling space, to give a local supply up in the workshop somewhere. All the sliding doors will have compressed air cylinders to provide a powerful and quick motive force to opening and closing the doors. We have seven sliding doors in total, not including the sliding door we got in our Garage already. So we inserted 20mm black conduit pipes at each of the sliding door modules, the Cloakroom, the Bathroom and another one for upstairs bathroom too. The ensuites already have these conduits installed. The final two, the Kitchen and Great Room also had been installed too.

We are thinking of extending the compress airline, all the way across the Great Room and put a connection in the Conservatory, alongside a Vacuum port as well.

Another set of conduit pipe was installed in various locations from the Hallway, this time it is for routing a fire suppression system up to the ceiling, to enable a nozzle to be placed in the middle of the ceiling in each large room. These nozzles will generate a water vapour “fog” to reduce the heat and severity of a potential outbreak of a fire. We have been researching on the web for the different suppression and there were several types of nozzles, some spraying droplets of water and others producing a mist or a fog. The empty conduits will allow us to thread a thin water pipe up to the ceiling so we can install such a system later on when we are satisfied with the appropriate design. The conduit is a black 25mm diameter polyethene pipe that we had purchased 10 years ago and it is big enough for us to thread water pipes up to 15mm in diameter.

Now, after we had finished checking our list of connections for the walls and halls, we got on with nailing up the various utility horizontal rails on the walls as per standard design.
One section of wall had to be extended to form the understairs cupboard, the Kitchen wall, coming out another 1260mm and then turning and heading towards the edge of the stairs.

Installing All Conduits and Pipes to Serve the Upper Floor from Hallway's Services

New-understair-cupboard-1


There is a standard 800mm door entrance, which is nicely aligned with the Cloakroom’s own entrance, which provides access to this small cupboard, going only a few feet under the stairs. The rest of the space underneath the stairs will be divided up into a set of sliding modules on wheels that will provide additional storage facilities, we can never have enough storage capacity in a modern house! The cupboard is a bit over 1300mm deep and we decided to build the back wall with short length of our Utility Channel, which will take a spur off from the Kitchen, and this will provide access to mains and other cabling, to charge up cordless equipment and the like.
Installing All Conduits and Pipes to Serve the Upper Floor from Hallway's Services

New-understair-cupboard-2

Also, as part of putting up the horizontal rails, we have been stuffing in lots of glass wool into the walls cavities to both block the sounds but also provide better fire protection. This is a very yukky job and we were wearing our dust masks with great relief, to say the least!

The Utility Channel was created as per normal, being located at the 800mm to 900mm position up the walls and we put in more conduits to make sure every section is accessible. We also built the “control box” near the Front Door to house the touch display panel but we won’t have any of the other bits and pieces inside (like fuses and audio amplifiers etc), mainly because it is not in a central location and would have meant long cable runs. So we are having a underfloor “control box” instead, located in the central part of the hall, where all the arms of the hallways meets together.

One of the other jobs we had to do, was to drill several holes through the concrete block walls of the Entertainment Room, to provide more access to the Utility Channel inside the room later on. But, because the solid nature of a concrete wall doesn’t allow us to fit the conduits and pipes in where we want with simple ease, hence why we had to drill through the concrete and insert a couple of 32mm diameter and 20mm conduits, going down into the underfloor space in the hallways next to the entrance.

The Air Channel, running around the bottom of the walls was created. We made four more air distributor modules, using the 40mm diameter plastic plumbing pipe parts but this time, with a right angle extra piece so the air ducting won’t stick out into the crowded space under the floorboards. We located one down Hall Three (near the Utility Room), another one along Hall Two section, outside the Kitchen and the final two are down by the Front Door, to provide both fresh and warm air to the coats and hats but also to give a boost to counteract any chilly air that rushes in when the door is opened. The 150mm high MDF 6mm thick strips were stapled and glued into place on all the wall sections, including the one going down to the Great Room where we had to finish off the floorboard, the last 420mm strip to reach the entrance.

Then, we continued putting up horizontal rails at the eye line point and finally, at the top of the walls, ready to have the OSB sheets fitted. But before we can do that particular job, we wanted to break up the long sections of wall so we created five Niches on several section of our halls, two are located down Hall One towards the Great Room opposite the Kitchen, one just on Hall Two next to the Bathroom entrance, the fourth one is located half way down Hall Three towards the Utility Room and the final one is around the corner on Hall Four just before the Entertainment Room’s entrance. They are all the same at 320mm wide by 420mm high and the basic depth is 101mm (except for the last one on the Entertainment Room because the wall leg is 25mm wider so this niche is deeper).
We built up the box using pieces of CLS timber and then glued a back panel on the back for three of them, to box off from the glass wool material. So, when we have put on the wall boards and the final finishing layer, these niches will be 125mm deep and if we put a oak “sill” in the bottom and it sticks out another 25mm, then we could have these little spaces in our walls that is six inches deep, enough for a vase of flowers or other things like ornaments. We also routed a 20mm conduit around from the Utility Channel to the top corner to provide a possible connection to provide built-in lighting, to give these niches a lovely soft glow.

Installing All Conduits and Pipes to Serve the Upper Floor from Hallway's Services

Hall-niches-with-conduits-to-utility-channel

And then, we inserted a few more conduits around our sliding door modules plus also a large conduit that goes up to the back wall of the Kitchen, aligned with the Utility channel where fatter and larger electric cables can be installed for the ovens and the hobs. Also, we inserted wooden lintels over various doorways, mainly the cupboards ones but also inserted small pieces of battens up inside the sliding door modules as well as a vertical post on either side of the entrance way, so it is ready to receive the pretty Oak architraves going around the edge of the door hole.

Finally, we layered in another load of glass wool strips, horizontally between the horizontal rails, using up two more rolls of 100mm thick wool. They are bulging well out of between the wooden rails, which is good as when the boards goes up, it will compress the wool down and improve the sound dampening qualities.

Installing All Conduits and Pipes to Serve the Upper Floor from Hallway's Services

Insulation-in-the-halls


It is very interesting to how quiet and soft the sound is in our hallways at the moment, because of all the glass wool absorbing most of the sounds. This is what we are hoping for when we have finished.

And .. at last .. we have put up the OSB 18mm boards, onto the framework, to finally make a solid walls along all our hallways, all four sections are now covered from floor to ceiling!
Plus also, we have cut out the Niches too, just to show those off too!

Installing All Conduits and Pipes to Serve the Upper Floor from Hallway's Services

Halls-boarded-1

Installing All Conduits and Pipes to Serve the Upper Floor from Hallway's Services

Halls-boarded-2

Installing All Conduits and Pipes to Serve the Upper Floor from Hallway's Services

Halls-boarded-3


That concludes the construction of all the four Halls and here is a small video showing our ground floor layout etc.

 Posted by at 6:00 pm
May 092022
 

We have now completed the construction of the basic shell that is our Kitchen. The floor and walls are now created to form the first stage of what will be the Kitchen later on.
The usual steps were executed in building this room, just like the others, building the floor support framework and all the utility rails up on the walls.

The Kitchen Shell Is Created

Kitchen-Floor-framing


But, the major different in here was the sheer number of conduits that we needed to have installed to provide various planned and future electrical, air and water provision. It is a busy room with lots of appliances and we had mapped out our design and layout of where these individual items will go, including providing space below the floors for custom refrigeration systems and not forgetting putting in a larger control box to enable us to have a larger display screen for showing recipes and other information. We even put in a vacuum “port” in the middle of the floor that will become part of the central spur of more worktop and work table coming out from the wall facing the hallway.
The Kitchen Shell Is Created

Kitchen-Refigeration-Zone-1

The Kitchen Shell Is Created

Kitchen-Refigeration-Zone-2

The Kitchen Shell Is Created

Kitchen-Refigeration-Zone-3

The Kitchen Shell Is Created

Kitchen-sink-zone


The Kitchen Shell Is Created

Kitchen-Hall-side-wall

The Kitchen Shell Is Created

Kitchen-wall-Left-of-window

The Kitchen Shell Is Created

Kitchwn-Great-room-side-wall

The Kitchen Shell Is Created

Vacuum-pipe-coming-up-through-the-floor


That pretty much concludes the main rooms on the ground floor, apart from the Great Room which we cannot do until we have used up the majority of the CLS timber upstairs and we cannot do that task until we have filled in the roof rafters with insulation and sealed it up with a vapour barrier plastic membrane. So, while we wait for more insulation to arrive, we will now work on the Hallways and build up the basic walls, putting in the Utility Channel and inserting many conduits etc. including lots of glass wool to aid sound insulation between the rooms. It will look very good when that is done!

 Posted by at 6:00 pm
Apr 142022
 

These last few weeks have seen the construction of the basic shell of the next bedroom to be completed. Bedroom One now has a solid wall and the flooring fully installed, following the same design similar to the other two bedrooms. But one of the first task to do, was to finally complete the fixing the vapour barrier layer up on to the “M” wall, including a layer of glass wool to provide fire protection and more thermal insulation too. This was a job hanging over from last year where we couldn’t finish this job as we needed access but was blocked for a few months. We got an electrical mains socket poking through the wall plus also underground water pipe and a couple of electrical connections too.

Completed Basic Wall and Flooring for Bedroom One

M-Wall-Vapour-Barrier-complete

We built the floor support framework, then after that, we had to make sure that we had all our conduits laid in inside the floor space, like for example, the hot water circulating pipes that is encapsulated in 100mm thick PU foam for maximum heat retention. This is going right across the entire bedroom and pops out into the Great Room, ready to swing around supply heat to the Great room  and finally terminates into the Kitchen. This was the continuation of the pipes coming from Bedroom Two, bending and wiggling through both en-suites.

Completed Basic Wall and Flooring for Bedroom One

Heating-pipes-in-Ensuite-12

Completed Basic Wall and Flooring for Bedroom One

Heating-pipes-crossing-Bedroom-1

Completed Basic Wall and Flooring for Bedroom One

Pipes-waiting-to-continue



Also, and especially, we had to install a 100mm air conduit going from the hall, cutting across the corner of the bedroom and going up the Great room wall to the First Floor. This is important because this is the air supply to bring fresh warm air to the back half of the upstairs room.
Completed Basic Wall and Flooring for Bedroom One

HVAC-pipe-for-upstairs-room


Other hidden conduits are the temperature sensors that monitors the condition of the buried Energy Module that stretches across the whole house (right from the Kitchen, the Hallway and Bedroom One) and these conduits all goes to the Hallway, under the liftable hatch for servicing etc.
The other under floor component is the plumbing chamber that sits just outside the ensuite doorway and this will contains the various water radiators and heat exchangers to serve the basin and shower units inside the ensuite, plus also other water connections like the outside tap for gardening and a watering system up under the Eves for any potential hanging flower baskets etc.
Completed Basic Wall and Flooring for Bedroom One

Ensuite-1-Plumbing-space


Next, the entire volume under the floorboard was filled in using 200mm thick glass wool insulation, folded at the pre-split point on the roll so that each piece is standing on its edge which should be much stronger and longer lasting than laying it out flat which may collapse under its own weight.
Completed Basic Wall and Flooring for Bedroom One

Bedroom-1-floor-insulated


The horizontal rails were then installed and the Control Box built that will serve the room’s electrical requirements etc. plus also laying in extra conduits to serve the ensuite with mains electricity for the vanity unit plus toilet itself. Also the sliding door system has compressed air and more electricity cabling that will control the mechanism.
Completed Basic Wall and Flooring for Bedroom One

Bedroom-1-Control-box

Completed Basic Wall and Flooring for Bedroom One

Ducts-around-Ensuite-1



Once all that was done, we then laid down a full covering of 22mm thick chipboard floorboards, all glued and screwed down to the framework. This then allowed us to insert our MDF 150mm high boards that forms the Air Channel around the bottom of the wall, which got sealed and then painted black. The Utility Channel was also similarly lined but using 10mm Fermacell “plasterboard” material instead, with was also glued in.
Completed Basic Wall and Flooring for Bedroom One

Bedroom-1-Floor-boards-done


Another yukky job was to fill in the volume inside the walls with more glass wool, two layers, one was vertical in the middle of the walls and then a horizontal layer going across between the wooden rails. This provides a double feature of providing better sound dampening properties but also better fire prevention and give us more time to handle emergency outbreak of fire.
Completed Basic Wall and Flooring for Bedroom One

Bedroom-1-Walls-insulated-1

Completed Basic Wall and Flooring for Bedroom One

Bedroom-1-Walls-insulated-2



This led to the final job of installing the basic underlying solid layer of OSB 18mm boards, all tongue and grooved together, all glued and screwed tightly onto the wall’s framework. The edges were trimmed around the window and the two doors.
Completed Basic Wall and Flooring for Bedroom One

Bedroom-1-Walls-boarded-1

Completed Basic Wall and Flooring for Bedroom One

Bedroom-1-Walls-boarded-2



We now have this bedroom completed and we can move on to the next room, the Kitchen, after Easter.

 Posted by at 4:00 pm
Mar 262022
 

One of our friends has their old Pergola wrecked by Storm Eunice and requested us to build a new replacement one. So over a week or so, We ordered a collection of timber, four square 75mm super treated by 3metres tall, and eight 100mm by 50mm regularised fully treated planks three of them slightly longer at 3.6metres and the other five 3metres.
We also bought four bitumen impregnated plastic sleeves that are slipped onto the lowest part of the square timber to provide doubly extra protection from ground rot and everything. These are heat shrunk tight to the wood by using a hot air gun, to seal the bitumen right into the timber fibre.
We installed the four posts first into the same location as the old posts were and then took more detailed measurements of exactly where they are located so we could cut and get the upper framework constructed in our workshop before returning to install it.

Constructed and Installed A Pergola for a Friend

Posts-Installed


We cut notches in both the three cross rails and the tie struts so that they all interlocked together and then cut angled ends to make them look more like the classic designs we have seen on the web.
Constructed and Installed A Pergola for a Friend

Top-Frame-fabricated


Each connection is screwed together using heavy duty stainless steel coach screws with stainless steel washers too. The clearance holes were sprayed with timber treatment solution to ensure that the wood is protected for the long term.
We then took the eight pieces around and had the fun of installing them up on the four posts, getting it all level and everything. We did have to make one adjustment because we hadn’t spotted an air vent coming out of the wall so we had to trim one of the structs a bit shorter and one of the cross rails that goes on the brick wall also a bit shorter too.
But everything slotted together nicely and we glued all the joints with PU glue, tightened up all the coach screws and left it to dry and cure overnight. We were very lucky with the weather!
Constructed and Installed A Pergola for a Friend

Half-laped-with-Stainless-caoch-screw


We finished up by scraping the excess glue away from the joints to make it all neat and tidy, and then fixed up several new stainless steel hooks that our friend bought for her hanging baskets and butterfly houses. We also reinstalled her outside camera again and got that connected back into her network so she can enjoy watching her hedgehogs playing and eating during the night.
Constructed and Installed A Pergola for a Friend

Pergola-complete

 Posted by at 6:00 pm
Mar 102022
 

Over the last three days, we have been moving all of our remaining sheet material that is outside in our yard area, at the bottom of the site.

Remaining Sheet Materials All Moved Into Bedroom Two

Piles-of-sheet-wood-waiting-to-be-moved


We were quite annoyed to discover that the extra heavy duty so-called high quality tarpaulin was degrading under the exposure to the Sun. We had to put on extra layers to help guide the rainwater away from the splits and holes that were forming in the tarpaulin, but we ended up losing three sheets of OSB 18mm boards in the end. So this is why we decided to move all of it into our newly completed Bedroom Two room, to avoid any further damage to our expensive timber.
So over the three days, using our large flat bed trolley to help move a heap at a time to the front door, and then walk each sheet into Bedroom Two, we first moved the 18mm OSB boards, all 162 sheets. We split the quantity into two separate piles, making sure that we can access at least one of them when we need more sheets as we construct each future room.
Remaining Sheet Materials All Moved Into Bedroom Two

Day-1-First-pallet-and-a-bit-moved


Next, we dealt with the 110 sheets of the 22mm groove and tongue chipboard floorboards, moving them also in Bedroom Two, putting third of them up on top of the OSB pile and the rest in a single column in front. We wanted to make sure that our wood rack will also fit in the remaining space in the room.
Remaining Sheet Materials All Moved Into Bedroom Two

End-of-Day-2-all-OSB-moved-and-start-of-floorboards

Remaining Sheet Materials All Moved Into Bedroom Two

Day-3-All-the-sheets-finally-moved



We have calculated that we have moved about 6 tons of wood and walked over 10,000 steps!!
The next job was to reassemble our old sheet wood rack, with four shelves, and then move all the miscellaneous sheet material that was temporary stored in Bedroom One and get it all back on the rack.
Remaining Sheet Materials All Moved Into Bedroom Two

Sheet-wood-rack-reassemeled-and-refilled


This three day effort now means that we can get on with the next room, the forementioned Bedroom One and continue with the construction of the basic internal rooms downstairs., and also laying in the water pipes that are running around the whole house serving the ensuites and bathroom plus kitchen. But we also have cleared the yard of any building material, avoiding any rainwater damage and also we gain some extra space ready for the next load of PU foam insulation boards that we will need soon, to finish off the roof.

Remaining Sheet Materials All Moved Into Bedroom Two

Bedroom-1-cleared

 Posted by at 5:00 pm
Mar 082022
 

After we reordered more glass wool insulation, we were finally able to resume the construction of Bedroom Two, doing the underlining basic panelling that will form the foundation for our walls. We finished loading in the last bits pieces of glass wool and then started working on each OSB board, to get them ready to be glued and screwed up onto the wall framework. Before we continued with this task, we took careful measurements of our control box

Underlying Basic Wall Panelling Installed

Final-insulation-in-wall

Underlying Basic Wall Panelling Installed

Bedroom-2-Control-panlel-location



And what will be the access panel above the ensuite sliding doorway (so we can service the pneumatic cylinders and valves that will move the two leaf doors).
Each OSB sheet had to be cut down by 70mm because all of them are lifted clear of the floorboard (by 38mm height) to allow the fresh air to enter into the room, and also our rooms are only 2415mm high which is just under the 8foot measure. Then, each OSB board then had a groove on one edge and a tongue on the opposite edge, cut using our router machine and a single prepared cutter bit that produces two tongues or two grooves. This allows us to join consecutive boards together on the wall and provides a smooth transition from sheet to sheet. While doing the cutting the router cutter sheared off! We had to pause whilst waiting for a stronger bit to come.
Underlying Basic Wall Panelling Installed

Sheared-off-router-cutter-1

Underlying Basic Wall Panelling Installed

Sheared-off-router-cutter-2



We went around the room anti-clockwise direction, going pass the window and then the ensuite doorway and finally back on the fourth wall with the room’s entrance way.
The last job was to trim off the excess sheet materials in and around the window and ensuite doorway, using our other router that has a straight cutter bit with a ball-bearing wheel to guide along the internal surface. This method gives us a very neat cut edge that surrounds the window hole and the doorway both.
Underlying Basic Wall Panelling Installed

Bedroom-2-all-walls-boarded-with-OSB-1

Underlying Basic Wall Panelling Installed

Bedroom-2-all-walls-boarded-with-OSB-2

Underlying Basic Wall Panelling Installed

Bedroom-2-all-walls-boarded-with-OSB-3



We decided that was all we are going to do in Bedroom Two, as we are not using it for DIY work so we will leave the job of cutting out the Utility Channel for later. But we will use this room as a storage depot for our remaining sheet materials that is currently located outside on our yard and the tarpaulin are not in very good conditions anymore.

 Posted by at 1:00 pm
Mar 052022
 

While we were waiting for some replacement router tongue and groove cutters, we decided to get on and finish the final piece of work we started last year in May, see Installed Dozens of Conduits and Pipes through the External Wall for Future Expansion for more details.
We had to wait because the location had a giant bag of insulation foam rubbish occupying the area, so only when we had emptied it, and tidied it all up, that we could gain access, to dig a large hole in the soil underneath the Bedroom One’s window. We drilled four holes through the concrete blocks, just underneath the slate skirt.

Finally Installed the Last of the Utility Connections for Outside Expansion

Holes-drilled-for-connections


The first one was a 16mm hole for the copper pipe and connector, ready for cold water to irrigate the garden. The next two holes were drilled with a 22mm drill bit plus a short depth of 25mm to accommodate the pipe adapter on the back of the electrical waterproof junction boxes. The final hole was also done using a 22mm bit and this one is for the temperature conduit that is buried into the soil, going down 2 metres. We got out our vacuum to drill this 2metre hole!
Finally Installed the Last of the Utility Connections for Outside Expansion

All-connections-installed


The water connection had a temporary outside tap fitted so we can have access to water without having to run the hose right around the whole garden.
Finally Installed the Last of the Utility Connections for Outside Expansion

Pipe-to-a-tap-on-a-pole

Finally Installed the Last of the Utility Connections for Outside Expansion

All-filled-in



The last uncompleted job was to install the weatherproof mains electric socket up on the wall itself, we will do that in a couple of weeks when we can get into the other corner, Bedroom One is full of sheet material at the moment.
Finally Installed the Last of the Utility Connections for Outside Expansion

Electric-socket-for-M-Alcove-1

Finally Installed the Last of the Utility Connections for Outside Expansion

Electric-socket-for-M-Alcove-2


 Posted by at 6:00 pm
Feb 272022
 

We spent the last couple of days, a few hours on each day, repairing the fence bordering our Loke, that was damaged by Storm Eunice back on the 18th February 2022. She had snapped one of the metal post holders in half, leaving the spike buried in the ground, while the socket part with its wooden post still in it, and also still attached to the wooden panels, was flung across the garden and part the way out on to the Loke too. It had broken several pieces of the framework making up a panel plus literally snapping a corner out of another panel.

Second Piece of Damage Caused by Storm Eunice, Our Wooden Fencing

Storm-damage-to-fence-1

Second Piece of Damage Caused by Storm Eunice, Our Wooden Fencing

Storm-damage-to-fence-2

Second Piece of Damage Caused by Storm Eunice, Our Wooden Fencing

Storm-damage-to-fence-3



After detangling the wooden panels from the fence post, unscrewing smashed support ties and other bits and pieces to get the panels separated, we were then took each one in turn into the house to repair and reinforce them back into some assemblance of normality. We actually repaired three in total, even though only two of the panels were lying on the ground, we found the first panel had some broken structs so that got done too.
Next, was to remove the metal socket off the wooden post (it was clamped on so just a case of loosening a couple of captive bolts) and then digging out the buried spike, bringing both pieces indoors and cleaning them up using grinding discs and wire wheels to get the protective paint off so it was ready for welding back together. We found some iron strips of band and used them to reinforce the whole thing, with lots of weld points everywhere. After that we painted it green, using a metal paint to help prevent major rusting and left it to harden overnight.
On the following afternoon, we proceeded to rebuild the fence, driving the repaired metal support holder back into the ground and then slid the wooden panels back into place. We had to relevel a couple of the concrete blocks under the middle panel but everything went back pretty neatly. We screwed all the wooden panels securely on to the post again to save them from slipping out in windy conditions.

That concludes the repairs caused by storm Eunice and hopefully we won’t suffer another incident any time soon!!

 Posted by at 4:00 pm
Feb 232022
 

This afternoon we took to the sky and repaired a smallish section of roof on our Temporary Living Quarters, damaged by Storm Eunice a couple of days ago. It managed to peel off half a strip of roofing felt down at the far end of the roof and a smaller piece also down that end too. We had some spare felt in the garden shed, some nails and half a tin of bitumen horrible black sticky glue. First of all, we levered up the edge of the next strip of felt up the roof (it was going over the central ridge line), got the nails out and slid under the edge a length of the new felt. We used plenty of the bitumen glue to stick down the edge and then nailed everything together to make sure the wind didn’t pick up the felt and cause more damage while the glue is drying. Then a smaller piece slid under the previous strip we just done and applied more glue to that overlapping edge too, finishing off with another line of nails, plus a dozen nails to pin down the loose edge that bends over the edge of the roof and down the wall a little way.

Storm Eunice Ripped Several Pieces of Roofing Felt Off

Temporary-living-roof-repaired


To make sure we did not suffer the same faith again, we screwed down a 6 foot length of batten across the end of the roof, to clamp down the ends of the roofing felt, and avoid the chance of another Storm coming along and ripping more felt off our roof!

 Posted by at 6:00 pm
Feb 072022
 

We took the opportunity to empty our builder’s rubble we have collected over the last couple of years. We had been loading up two separate ton bags with various rubbish like concrete blocks cut-offs, rubble, cement board pieces, sandy dirt and other builder’s junk that we couldn’t burn. We had teamed up with our neighbours and hired jointly a large skip which was loaded up with more builder’s rubble and dirt from the bottom of the Loke and the earth bank that separates us from the school field, and there was enough room left over to allow us to empty our own rubbish.

Removal of Builder's Rubble

Feb-2022-skip-filled-with-Loke-debris-and-building-rubbish


One very full skip which will be taken away soon.

 Posted by at 1:00 pm