shaun

Nov 092019
 

Monday saw the start of a new period in our work, the clock had gone back at the weekend and we have lost an hour of work in the afternoon so we decided to shift our work day to start at 9am instead of 10am and finish at 5pm when it gets dark instead of 6pm.
We got on with putting the rubber liners in the three gutters for section ‘F’, ‘G’ and ‘H’, all stuck down. Mind you, we had to dry the gutters out first beforehand, with several towels and a heat gun running at 500°C!! The two ends of each rubber liner was stuck down on to the fibre-glass resined corners of the guttering with contact glue as we have done all the while and so finally, we have done the very last three corners.
The last little task was to put up the valley membrane and wooden counter battens, ready to support and hold the grey glass-fibre valley trough.

Tuesday and Wednesday, we got all the breathable membrane up along with their counter vertical battens to hold it down, plus some widely spaced out tile battens so we could climb up and down easily. The last job before it got dark was to nail all the flashing battens on the Hips and Ridges, 4 hips and 1 ridge sections.
With these last three sections of roof (‘F’, ‘G’ and ‘H’) done, this means that we now have at last, a completely waterproof roof right across the whole building!

Thursday was a good day, still chilly but with sunny intervals. Firstly, we put up the spacers up on the kerb of the Skylight and stapled on the rubber strip ready for the slates and the aluminium protective strip to go up. Then we managed to get all the rubber membrane up on the flashing battens, followed by the OSB bull-nose strips and covered with the glass-fibre ribbon.
And then coated it in two layers of resin to produce our bull nose protection to divert the rain water away from the joints between the roof sections. All done before the forecast of rain arriving in the early morning hours of Friday. This was the last of this type of task, no more glass-fibre and resin out on the roof or gutters… all done now!

Section F, G and H Gets Attention - At Last!

Hip-Flashing-for-FG-H-finished

Friday was an alternative day of meetings and other commitments [It also rained a bit].

Saturday was rather wet and we only managed to do a couple of hours on the roof, putting up some tile battens and instead worked in the workshop making a sound reducing cabinet for our little CNC milling machine.

Monday was a slow start because of another appointment but we did work in the afternoon on the roof and got all of ‘F’ and half of ‘H’ done with the tile battens. When it got dark (at 5pm), we continued in the workshop to continue with our cabinet.

Tuesday was a nice day, well almost a nice day until the gentle showery weather arrived late in the afternoon. We got all the tile battens up, we put up the first section of trough in up the valley and cut the top smaller section to fit and did the necessaries to slice off the bull nose and then glass-fibre and resin the hole to hold the rain water in.

We also started putting on the metal mesh along the guttering.

Wednesday saw the completion of the mesh over the guttering along the ‘F’, ‘G’ and ‘H’ sections. We now have fully finished all the guttering right around the whole house. We only just made it and we had one 300mm strip left over from an original roll of metal mesh 900mm wide by 25metres long.

Section F, G and H Gets Attention - At Last!

Mesh-on-gutters-complete

The afternoon task was to replace the first section of the skylight kerb we did back in March where we had originally put up slate pieces to protect the rubber membrane and we had decided to switch over to the better looking aluminium strip instead. So we had to break off the slates, reposition the spacers to align with the 2metre strips and then nail on the replacement pieces (all done whilst sitting on the skylight working between our legs). We also got the last section all done on the end of the skylight including the support rods for the safety wire.

Thursday, we got the safety wire strung up on all the support rods, on each side of the skylight. We did this by shuffling sideways on the windows of the skylight and leaning down to deal with the stainless steel wire. Each wire, four of them, one for each side of the kerb, was clamped into place and then tightened up until the wire was good and solid, with a minimum slack in the length, ready for when we clip on a ladder or a safety harness to enable us to service the skylight or roof.

Section F, G and H Gets Attention - At Last!

Safety-Wire-along-IM

Section F, G and H Gets Attention - At Last!

Safety-Wire-along-H

Section F, G and H Gets Attention - At Last!

Safety-Wire-tensioning-buckle


Friday we got the preparations all done for the last three sections of roof, namely ‘F’, ‘G’ and ‘H’, marking up where the initial hook nails goes for the first line of slates under the metal mesh, before folding the mesh down on top of the batten. We also projected a vertical line up the ‘H’ roof and then marked off the beginnings of each batten so we can be assured that all the slates on each row will align up, all nice and neat.
Then spent the rest of the morning and afternoon, putting up the last hundred or so slates on the ‘E’ roof we left unfinished because we didn’t have easy access (and safe) to lean over the hips and ridges to get them in.

Section F, G and H Gets Attention - At Last!

Mesh-and-bottom-row-of-hooks-on-H

Saturday’s work got the flashing slates done on the ‘E’ section and then the whole of the ‘F’ section was completed too except for the flashing slates on the right hand side.

Section F, G and H Gets Attention - At Last!

E-Slating-Finished

Section F, G and H Gets Attention - At Last!

F-slating-done-almost


Next week will get the ‘G’ roof section done and hopefully most, and perhaps get all, of the ‘H’ section finished too.

 Posted by at 5:00 pm
Oct 262019
 

Monday was a wet day so we did other tasks inside the temporary quarters finishing off repair work caused by the Flood.
Tuesday was a nice lovely day so we got outside and finished mounting the oak pieces to build the gutters, for the last three sections of the roof, joining back to the very beginning when we started all those months ago.

Gutters, Porch and Windows

FG-H-gutter-woodwork-finished


Wednesday saw the glass-fibre and resin applied to the three corners (two outside corners and one inside one connecting to the downpipe channel) before the rain came at 5pm!
Gutters, Porch and Windows

FG-GH-corners-fibreglassed

Gutters, Porch and Windows

Second-half-of-HI-Corner-fibreglassed-8-months-later



Thursday: Inspected the new gutters and analysed the flow of the rainwater along the side door porch’s gutter to see if we needed to jack up the middle of the beam supporting the porch’s fascia and guttering. This was all done before we put up our new aluminium support arm. The results were that nothing was adjusted as the rainwater flowed at optimum rates so we simply screwed the diagonally mounted arm into place.
Gutters, Porch and Windows

Middle-porch-support-installed

Gutters, Porch and Windows

Blocking-added-to-EH-corner



The afternoon was spent in the workshop processing the oak timber that forms the octagon side pieces for each window. We hadn’t attended this task for a while and we discovered that some of the oak pieces had warped very slightly and we are wondering whether that will badly affect the quality of the join when we make the octagon joints. So we took four pieces, 2 wide and 2 narrow ones, and sliced them down to the required widths of 97mm and 70mm. there are two straight ones and two of the slightly warped ones. We will then put the pieces through the router with the special cutter to form the tongue and groove joint angled (at 22.5°) and learn how they fit together with different conditions.
Friday morning duly saw the test pieces processed and the tongue and groove seem to be working just fine, including the ones that were slightly warped. This meant that we could and did carry on and we processed all the other fifty pieces of oak timber, slicing a new 45degree angled slope at a consistent width, a wider one of 97mm and a narrower one at 70mm.
On Saturday, we got on with the job of cutting the 22.5° angled tongue and groove special joint on all the pieces of oak and also rounded off the sharp edge on the wide pieces. We have two sets of oak pieces with quite a series of cuts and slices.
Gutters, Porch and Windows

Window-octagon-parts-to-cover-cladding-ends

Gutters, Porch and Windows

Tounge-and-groove-octagon-joints

Gutters, Porch and Windows

Test-octagon-parts-glued-up



For next week, the weather forecast is for dry but chilly days so we will be working out on the roof to get the rubber liners in the gutters and then get the breathable membrane strips up and all the wooden battens nailed into place too.

 Posted by at 6:00 pm
Oct 122019
 

Last Sunday (the 6th), supposed to be a day of rest, saw but we saw the worst day in our time here at Roselea with 8 hour period of rain, rain and more rain falling upon us, starting from about 8am and finishing about 4pm!

59.1mm

Yes, that is the amount of water that indeed landed on us! Which produced a catalogue of “hair pulling” moments!
It all started fairly mundane which the rain falling steadily, not so heavily at a rate of about 8mm per hour, until lunch time. We had about 18mm of rain by then. the first blast that hit us dumped rain on us at a rate of 36mm per hour but only for about 10 minutes, adding another 6mm in that short time. We were surviving up to that point, our defences were holding and there were no signs of rainwater from our surrounding neighbours who had improved their drainage in the last few years. We just had a little pond forming on our driveway with much of the water out on the Loke.

Rain, Rain, Rain forms Rivers, Lakes plus Seas and Lots of Pumping!

The-first-defence-falls

Rain, Rain, Rain forms Rivers, Lakes plus Seas and Lots of Pumping!

Only-a-small-amount-of-water-so-far



But ..
Only an hour later during our lunch break (we had to abandon our preparations!!) the real downpour arrived! Just before this point, the rain gauge was reporting 30mm and in the next 45 minutes, it jumped up to 50mm!
This is when all defences were breached and water then turned into rivers and gushed from all directions and our small ponds became lakes and seas ..
Rain, Rain, Rain forms Rivers, Lakes plus Seas and Lots of Pumping!

Driveway-Flooded-to-150mm-deep

Rain, Rain, Rain forms Rivers, Lakes plus Seas and Lots of Pumping!

Water-surrounding-the-garage



Our swimming lane which was empty is suddenly full, a metre deep, 1.2 metres wide and 20 metres long, completely full of water! This was because the neighbouring workshop and garage saw their own rain soak-away module be swamped and all the surface water rushed towards and into our garden! We estimated about 20,000 litres arrived that way plus also a fair amount came from the grassy slopes of the neighbouring properties, so much so that our sandy soil became boggy!!
Rain, Rain, Rain forms Rivers, Lakes plus Seas and Lots of Pumping!

Swimming-lane-filling-with-flood-waters-from-the-neighbors

Rain, Rain, Rain forms Rivers, Lakes plus Seas and Lots of Pumping!

Swimming-lane-full



We had so much on our driveway where our Loke collected tons of water and dumped it on us too. We calculated another 20,000 litres came in that way too, it flooded our garden shed, it just missed flowing into our main house (just a tiny trickle) and got to within an inch of our garage floor level.
We also had rising water back filling one of our large diameter conduit in the back of the garage and got about 2 inches of water under our raised flooring but we think it didn’t go any higher because the water started pouring down the earth tubes which were buried in the concrete floor and the lips of the tubes were about an inch above this level.
Rain, Rain, Rain forms Rivers, Lakes plus Seas and Lots of Pumping!

Water-coming-up-through-large-duct-on-the-front-right

Rain, Rain, Rain forms Rivers, Lakes plus Seas and Lots of Pumping!

Garage-all-wet


But the driveway got so deep that it managed to get into our front door, up the hallway and got into our store room.

Rain, Rain, Rain forms Rivers, Lakes plus Seas and Lots of Pumping!

The-flooded-loke-and-driveway-from-above

So on our day of rest, we bent down to the task of mopping up the wet stuff, sweeping the water out of the garage, pumping the lake over to the school field and the ditch on their side, and pumping out the flood in our hall way and store room.
What a day we had!
Nearly 60mm of rain in 8 hours which is only 7.5mm per hour but then when one gets hit with a 48mm per hour rain rate, for only 15 minutes, nothing can cope with that!!
We have switched on our heating systems to give us some warmth and start the drying out process. Tomorrow, we will continue inspecting our home and see what state our store room is in etc.
Oh boy!
The one good spark in all this gloom was that our new main house didn’t suffer anything, no floods, no leaks and once we have our proper doorways fitted then nothing will get in! Hurray!

All this flooding meant that the following week was spent recovering from this flood. We half emptied the store room of all the boxes and furniture to assess damage, dry things out and repack several dozen boxes. Everything is almost back in the store room now. The garage is tidied up and dried out too and the space under the back room floor had dried as best as it can do on its own but we will have to do a proper review of our garage when we have moved in properly into our new home. We even managed to do a day of slating!

 Posted by at 6:00 pm
Oct 052019
 

For this week of many disrupted days, we managed only to get a little progress on putting the slates on the roof. We didn’t get going until mid-week where we finally got enough dry weather to complete the repair work on the corner of the gutters, the C-D outside corner of the front porch. This finally allowed us to complete the task of installing the metal mesh onto the guttering plus also mounting the oak strips to clamp down the mesh and rubber edges, finishing off the “B” section, the “C”, “D” and almost all the “E” too.
We then put on the first two rows of slates along the bottom of the “C” section to protect the metal mesh and got started on the “D” side section of the front porch module. We did managed to get two solid days of work in and we mounted about 500 slates on to the roof. A slow task as we have short diagonal strips with the valley and hip ends fairly close together, so lots of cutting and moving equipment many times.

Gutters Covered and a Good Half of

Most-of-D-slated


Next week, we hope to get much better weather, hence less interruptions and get more slates on the “D” and “E” sections.

 Posted by at 6:00 pm
Oct 022019
 

The start of the week saw the roofs of both our Store Room and our Living Quarters get new coverings. The picture below is the image of it all before hand ..

New Roof Covering on Store Room and Living Quarters!

Store-room-old-felt

New Roof Covering on Store Room and Living Quarters!

Temporary-Living-old-felt

New Roof Covering on Store Room and Living Quarters!

Garden-shed-old-felt



On Monday, we got on with the Store Room, putting on five new strips of the standard cheap roofing felt, using the black bitumen glue and some nails around the edges. We released the transparent corrugated plastic sheets so we could slide in a new strip of the felt and then refitted the foam and screws.
New Roof Covering on Store Room and Living Quarters!

Store-room-new-felt


Then on Wednesday, on the next dry day, we then put on four and half strips of the roofing felt on the Living Quarters, making sure we overlapped the old original joints of the old felt with plenty of bitumen glue plus plenty of nails too around the edges and along one of the joints near the ridge line that does feel the force of the prevailing wind coming from the south west.
New Roof Covering on Store Room and Living Quarters!

Temporary-Living-new-felt


We ran out of the bitumen glue so we are awaiting for more to come before we can finish this task of protecting our temporary structures, the last one being our garden shed, sometime next week.

 Posted by at 6:00 pm
Sep 282019
 

A very disrupted week with a major family commitment and duty to perform, we got only a couple of days of work done. But we managed to complete the “B” section of the roof plus also a repair job on the corner of the guttering.
We did some slates on Monday morning and then resumed Thursday and Saturday, to install a further 700 more slates. It was quite tricky leaning over the very steep side of the “C” roof in doing the edge and also putting on the flashing slates too, but it is all done now apart from just a dozen flashing slates along the ridge line towards the skylight.
We also put on some of the metal mesh covers on the gutters, just enough so we could complete this roof section but still do some further work in another part of the guttering.

Slates on Section B, Mesh Covered On Gutter plus Repair to C-D Corner

B-Slating-Finished


During the week, on one of the odd mornings, we noticed that in the C-D corner of the gutters, there was a crack in the fibre glass which was caused by the whole fabric being stressed too much when the joint of the D side of the guttering had warped. We had fixed that problem last week and it seems to be holding now, but the damaged was already done to the fibre-glass layer over the other side of the corner. It was leaking rain water and that how we noticed the fault. So after filing away the fibre-glass and resin material to a width of about an inch on each side of the joint of the oak underneath, plus also grinding away a shallow gulley into the wood itself, we then cleaned out the joint with the compressed air, blasting right through. We then push an amount of our PU solid glue and worked it into the joint on both side and including the fascia joint too and left it to cure and set rock hard.
Slates on Section B, Mesh Covered On Gutter plus Repair to C-D Corner

Repairing-CD-corner-gutter


We will put on a final coating of resin with glass-fibre to recombine the original membrane of the glass-fibre resin layer and resurface it back to a smooth finish and then put on more mesh covers on the rest of the gutters.
That about concludes this week’s work and we say a sad goodbye to our Aunty Melba whom we all said our farewell on Tuesday, and we will continue next week in her honour to get on with our house.

 Posted by at 6:25 pm
Sep 252019
 

On Wednesday, we performed a quick and dirty fix to our roof over our temporary living quarters and rolled up our Sun shield tarpaulin covering over our corridor.
We suddenly sprang lots of leaks on Tuesday morning during some heavy weather and discovered on the following day that the strips of the roofing felt had shrunk enough to pull apart at the overlapping joints. So we applied a quick fix by inserting a long narrow strip of rubber in between the two layers of the felt and that would hopefully stops most of the water from entering our home.

We then rolled up the Sun Shield tarpaulin off the corrugated plastic roof and put that away, plus also completely removed the mid-section support arm and their concrete blocks (all stored on our main garage roof for the time being), so it is ready for the whole roof to be recovered in a brand new layer of roofing felt when the weather is dryer and less windy. We also inspected the roof over our store room and the garden shed and decided that both needed recovering too.
Therefore we ordered 13 more rolls of felt plus a tin of glue and roofing nails and we will grab any portion of any day that is dry, to put on as many strips of new felt each time. we are unlikely to get a whole day or so of dry warm and calm weather so we have to take this approach to grab each moment as it present itself.

 Posted by at 4:30 pm
Sep 212019
 

For the start of the week, under a damp chilly sky, we gave our nail gun a inspection and discovered that it needed oiling in the drive piston  chamber. It was rather dry and sticky with old oil. But the air line should be supplying a tiny amount of oil every time the gun is fired but the device is not apparently working. But at least after cleaning and oiling it , we now have a fully working gun back again!

We proceeded to cover the “D” and “E” sections of the roof with the breathable membrane and put on all the wooden tile battens which makes it now waterproof and ready for slates to be mounted. This took the whole day Monday, the mornings of Tuesday and Wednesday plus morning of Thursday to complete.

Roof Section D and E Covered in Membrane and Battens and Slates Coverage Progresses on Section B.

D-E-partially-battened

Roof Section D and E Covered in Membrane and Battens and Slates Coverage Progresses on Section B.

D-E-fully-battened



The latter half of Tuesday was spent making the third aluminium support arm for holding up the Side Porch. The new length of the 2inch square tube arrived last week and we were able to complete this task of reinforcing the roof of the Side Porch.
Roof Section D and E Covered in Membrane and Battens and Slates Coverage Progresses on Section B.

Center-porch-support-made


And the latter half of Wednesday was spent making stainless steel support posts for our skylight to attach a hook wire around for safety and ladders. We needed one more pillar post as we seemed to have mislaid one or miscounted when we made the original set.

We continued on Thursday afternoon and also most of Friday, putting up more wooden battens that forms the structure for holding the flashing slates. We used the string to maintain a straight line, but the right hip has a slight curve in it so we had to follow this curve. It probably wouldn’t be noticeable unless one looks very carefully. We had to skip the remainder of Thursday afternoon so we resumed Friday (and took most of the day) putting on the rubber membrane band and the bull-nose wooden strip which was then covered in the fibre-glass + dark grey resin coating.

Roof Section D and E Covered in Membrane and Battens and Slates Coverage Progresses on Section B.

Rubber-and-bullnose-on-BCD-hips-and-ridge-


For late Thursday afternoon, we needed to do the valley trough, installing two full lengths and a specially modified shorter piece that fits right up where the ridge and the skylight meets together. The modifications were done late in the workshop after 6pm so that would be ready in the morning.
Roof Section D and E Covered in Membrane and Battens and Slates Coverage Progresses on Section B.

Top-of-DE-valley-trough


We also (again late Thursday afternoon) completed putting up the flashing rubber membrane strip along the kerb of the skylight and covered it up with the aluminium protection horizontal band.
Roof Section D and E Covered in Membrane and Battens and Slates Coverage Progresses on Section B.

Skylight-kerb-flashed


The next job, after finishing the flashing protection strips, from mid-afternoon of Friday, was to cut strips of the metal mesh off our supply roll. We finished off the entire roll and we now have a pile of mesh with a bent bump near the front of each strip to act as a rain water drip deflector. We hope we have enough to finish the job of covering the remaining gutters from “C” to “H”.
On Saturday, we did a little repair job on the C-D corner of the gutters where the joint has warped a bit and there wasn’t enough PU glue in first place. so we clamped the oak timber back into shape again and filled all the gaps with more PU glue after we had sanded and rubbed inside the joint to get some clean surfaces again.

So we decided that because the glue and clamps are in the way, we would instead continue on putting up slates. We got back to the “B” section of the roof and spent some time marking out the initial positions of each row going up the valley using our large framing square and string to get a vertical line to project back on each row to the valley to mark the regular nailing points. Then we also did the same on the “C” section but this time, exactly in the middle so we know where to start the slates from when we want to cover the roof and generate our special pattern.
And finally, for the rest of the day, we started putting up more slates, on the “B” roof portion, another 150 slates, going up the valley, doing all the angled slices in the slate hanging over the valley trough. It is a long laborious job but we got there, right to the top!

Roof Section D and E Covered in Membrane and Battens and Slates Coverage Progresses on Section B.

Slating-started-on-B

Roof Section D and E Covered in Membrane and Battens and Slates Coverage Progresses on Section B.

C-Roof-slate-alignment-marked



So for the start of the new week, we will put on the metal mesh over the gutters and then continue putting up a further 3500 slates to cover all the roof sections from “B” to “E” we have prepared.

 Posted by at 6:20 pm
Sep 142019
 

The start of the week was a bit damp with a very light rain falling almost all day Monday. We resumed work on our roof by nailing and gluing the layers of plywood strips to make up the flashing structure for the Hips and Ridge that goes up the Side Porch and up to the Skylight on the E-H corner. We had to saw several lengths of plywood strips from our left-over pile (to make the 175mm wide pieces) and cut three more 100mm 15mm thick strips. But that is all done now and that also see the completion of this job of putting up these flashing strips as there is no more to do!!

Preparation of Hips and Ridges All Completed, Gutters Installed and Rubber Liners Inserted In Gutters

Hips-and-ridges-for-EFG-H-1

Preparation of Hips and Ridges All Completed, Gutters Installed and Rubber Liners Inserted In Gutters

Hips-and-ridges-for-EFG-H-2



So for the following day, Tuesday, we were able to get on with the job of installing the gutters, using our pile of Oak timber pieces, ready in their two styles. But we discovered that we are running out of pieces! We had only five and half lengths (2metres each) of our base boards and seven lengths of the front vertical pieces. This only allowed us to complete the remainder of the ‘E’ section and around the corner onto the ‘F’ (the Side Porch). We did have enough to continue around again to the ‘G’ section which is very short and has a downpipe channel located at the end but no more than that to enable us to complete the last section ‘H’ which needed three more base boards. So we decided to stop short on the ‘F’ section and make more Oak pieces in our workshop when it rains next time.
So we glued the base boards in and then got the front vertical pieces push on, glued and clamped, all the way to just short of completing the ‘F’ section, which now enables us to get the valley in the D-E corner to be prepared and get the Front Porch covered in slates.
Preparation of Hips and Ridges All Completed, Gutters Installed and Rubber Liners Inserted In Gutters

E-Gutter-wood-glued-in

Preparation of Hips and Ridges All Completed, Gutters Installed and Rubber Liners Inserted In Gutters

Half-of-F-gutter-done



Wednesday started a bit damp so we couldn’t get on doing the fibre-glass and resin process to seal the E-F outside corner so instead we got on with putting up the breathable membrane and half the tile battens on the ‘C’ roof section. It was very interesting as this roof is very steep at 60°!! We had more showers at noon so we came in for a discussion on slate tiling patterns and then had lunch.
Thursday was a lovely day and we got on with the task of putting up more battens on the ‘C’ and ‘B’ roof sections and they are now both complete and ready for slates.
Preparation of Hips and Ridges All Completed, Gutters Installed and Rubber Liners Inserted In Gutters

B-battens-finished

Preparation of Hips and Ridges All Completed, Gutters Installed and Rubber Liners Inserted In Gutters

C-battens-installed



During the day, after lunch, after waiting for the wood surfaces to be dry enough (after the rain we had yesterday), we proceeded to fibre-glass and resin the outer corner of the guttering, where the E-F sections intersects. With this done, we can now insert the rubber liner.
Finally, on Saturday (Friday?s work was lost due to other commitments), we indeed got our rubber liner inserted into the gutter running along the ‘E’ section of the roof. That was the morning’s task and after lunch, we then ran up a strip of membrane up the valley and nailed six lines of 38mm wide counter battens that supports the valley trough. And finally, we started putting up the breathable membrane bands across horizontally the ‘D’ and ‘E’ sections of the roof. We only managed to get one line up as our usual nail gun was playing up and misfiring the nails. We swopped over to our alternative gun that uses full headed nails held together in a strip by a plastic material moulded around the nails.
But then we tackled the first tile batten and the nail gun was doing funny things to the nail strips, this time they were the 50mm long nails. We had no problems with the 64mm ones! So we are having a jinx on our tools at the moment. Phew!
Finally, to finish off the day, we applied black mastic sealant to the ends of the rubber liner to make sure that water cannot creep in.
Preparation of Hips and Ridges All Completed, Gutters Installed and Rubber Liners Inserted In Gutters

E-Gutter-done-and-start-of-battens


Next week, we will get on putting up the breathable and battens to get both ‘D’ and ‘E’ sections water tight and ready for the next load of slates to go on.

 Posted by at 6:00 pm
Sep 072019
 

Monday, we had a little quick job of making some extra shelving for our living quarters, made out of pieces of plywood lying around

Metal Posts Installed, Platform Modules Rearranged and Guttering Completed for E

New-shelves-for-Mum


Then we got on with installing the last two metal aluminium legs for the Front Porch and its roof. We managed to hoist up the beam running underneath the roof edge, using our car hydraulic jack to lift it up 10mm on the outer corner and then a more distance (30mm) in the middle. All three legs are now bolted down into the concrete foundation pads and the plain steel concrete bolts were covered in bitumen sealant to protect them from damp sand in the long run. The top of the legs were screwed into the wooden beam using stainless steel coach screws.
Metal Posts Installed, Platform Modules Rearranged and Guttering Completed for E

3-metal-poch-legs

Metal Posts Installed, Platform Modules Rearranged and Guttering Completed for E

Porch-leg-concrete-bolts-masticed



The final job of Monday was to clean out the man-hole chamber that got damaged several months ago by a delivery van driver. We used our vacuum cleaner to suck up the sand and then wrapped a strip of rubber membrane around the top of the chamber to cover up the broken edge to stop further sand and soil to leak in. we will do a proper repair later on when we get the driveway laid.
Metal Posts Installed, Platform Modules Rearranged and Guttering Completed for E

Manhole-repaired-2

Metal Posts Installed, Platform Modules Rearranged and Guttering Completed for E

Manhole-repaired-1



Tuesday morning was spent going around the eves cleaning the excess brown glue away from the rafters coming down to the back of the fascia, doing about half of the circuit before lunch.
After lunch, we resumed our task of moving the platform modules to their new position.
Wednesday was spent all day adjusting the platform modules including moving the lift shaft into its final position (where it will serve us right to the end of completing the whole roof).
Thursday was another half workforce day, so the second set of the aluminium bracing support were made, this time for the Side Porch. These arms are angled at 53° from the wall surface about 6 feet off the ground and reaches out all the way to the corner of the framework beam.

We wanted to avoid having straight vertical posts supporting the porch so we can move vehicles around on our driveway without the fear of bumping into a leg and causing complicated damage to the overhanging porch and the roof. The angle was derived by calculation the stress and strain numbers on the 50mm square tube and the 53° position turned out to be the surprising optimum angle! Late afternoon, we installed one of the new arms on the E-F corner, all screwed using four stainless steel 80mm by 6mm hex head coach screws at each mounting plate.

Metal Posts Installed, Platform Modules Rearranged and Guttering Completed for E

Angled-porch-support-EF


Friday, we put up the second arm, similar to the first arm and it was screwed with more stainless steel hex head coach screws.
Metal Posts Installed, Platform Modules Rearranged and Guttering Completed for E

Angled-porch-support-FG

We had designed the porch with just two supports but discovered that we hadn’t fully appreciated in how flexible a 6metre beam would be and not having a third middle support point meant that we are likely to have a dip in our gutters especially after we have loaded the slates on to the roof! So we spent the day installing a middle horizontal additional support beam. We had to cut out a rectangular hole in the middle of the existing beam to allow a 89mm CLS timber to be inserted and a similar hole in the wall in between the Utility room’s window and door. That was the middle layer so two lengths were glued and clamped on top and underneath to stiffen it up. Behind the wall, we also put in a third layer underneath the two existing layers (of the top plate) and that was glued and clamped as well.

Metal Posts Installed, Platform Modules Rearranged and Guttering Completed for E

New-midspan-top-brace-on-F-porch


The last piece of structural piece of work to be executed was to provide a vertical post behind the cement board so we could screw the metal arm into place later on. This post forms the third side of the triangle that forms a combined structural element to hold up the middle of the Side Porch roof and gutters. The post is made up of three 95mm by 45mm regularised timber pieces, two of them glued together to produce a square core element and the third piece glued and screwed overlapping the front surfaces including the top and bottom timber layers of the original wall.
Metal Posts Installed, Platform Modules Rearranged and Guttering Completed for E

New-wall-post

Metal Posts Installed, Platform Modules Rearranged and Guttering Completed for E

Top-new-wall-post



On Saturday, we repaired the temporary Loke fence where some sections had torn the plastic webbing. One of the wooden posts proved to be fragile and rotten at ground level so we replaced that post with a new round post. Then using the left-over length of the fencing, replaced the torn sections and threaded a rope weaving in and out of the top line of the webbing to provide a stronger support for the plastic fence against strong winds.
Metal Posts Installed, Platform Modules Rearranged and Guttering Completed for E

Loke-edge-fence-renewed


The excess glue was cleared away off our new middle support beam and sanded it down hard to reduce the blobs of bubbled glue along the joins.

Finally, we finished setting up the platform modules with all the safety side strips and installing the motor into the lift shaft.

Metal Posts Installed, Platform Modules Rearranged and Guttering Completed for E

Scaffold-platforms-and-Lift-moved


We are ready to resume work next week on the roof now and get the Side Porch prepared for tiling and allow us to complete the Front Porch, at last!

 Posted by at 6:00 pm