shaun

Jul 132019
 

We started this week with good dry weather in resuming the job of mounting Slates up on to the roof. We finished off the little bit left to do on the “N” roof section and then moved around to then complete the whole of the “O” section in the first couple of days.

Nearly 2000 Slates Mounted + Some Work on Window Frames

N-O-Complete


One of the finishing task was to place and nail the flashing slates along both sides of the Hip and Ridge lines, remembering to do this job each time we got up a strip of slates as the opportunity had only a limited window to practically and safely do the nailing while leaning over across the slates.
We had one small moment of interruption with the forecast of the weather showing an afternoon of sharp summer thunderstorms so we diverted our efforts to the workshop and got on with the task of preparing the next batch of Oak Timber to make the vertical side framing pieces of our 13 windows. We pulled out 26 lengths of Oak timber and after careful analysis of the grain patterns, we swopped six of these planks for another set. The first job was to trim off one edge to make it straight using our track saw. Then after that, we set up our bench saw with the fence guide set at 105mm and proceeded to slice all 26 planks down to this width. Some of the cut-off pieces, the bigger ones, went back on the Oak rack storage for later use, and the smaller pieces went into the garden shed to be added to other left-over pieces, also to be use later on.
Nearly 2000 Slates Mounted + Some Work on Window Frames

Window-sides-cut-to-size


But when the sun was out and the day was dry, we carried on working on the roof, mounting more Slates, now on the “P” section. This large area has one complex situation to be dealt with and that is the Conservatory roof (the “Q” section) poking out. The way slates (and for that matter, all other types of roofing tiles as well) are installed, one has to always start at the bottom of the cascading nature of these overlapping tiles. This means that we have to start at the bottom at the gutters, on both side of the conservatory and we must get the alignment of the slates the same so when the two sides come up and meet at the middle of the “Q” ridge line, they will marry together “Nice and Neat” and continue up to finish off at the skylight.
So we had to project a couple of vertical lines and then project out sideways over the ridge line and come back down again to the gutter on the other side. We hope this will work but we will double check when we get to work on the other side and compare the positioning of the slates etc.
By the end of the week, we got about half of the “P” roof covered, almost reaching the “Q” Ridge line, which is where we stopped.
Nearly 2000 Slates Mounted + Some Work on Window Frames

P-Half-done


So for this week’s work, we put up about 1800 slates, about the content of one crate, and next week, we will then do the two sides of the “Q” roof and start on the second side of the “P” roof (after making sure we are aligned). We hope the weather will hold good again but if not, then we will work in the workshop on our windows again – No Rest for the Crew – smile!

 Posted by at 6:00 pm
Jul 062019
 

On this rainy day, we worked in the workshop on our Oak timber pieces for our window frames.
We carried on with the task of shaping the Sills and the Headers with 45 degree angles at the ends and cut a small bevelled edge on all the visible front edges. Next we routed a drip channel on the bottom, near the front edge of each piece and then sanded all the marks and colourations away to produce two sets of smooth finished pieces, the bottom and top pieces for our windows.

Finished off the Oak Sills and Headers for the 13 Windows

Sills-complete

Finished off the Oak Sills and Headers for the 13 Windows

Headers-complete

Finished off the Oak Sills and Headers for the 13 Windows

Header-edge-details



The next job for the next rainy day, is to grab the pile of Oak timber planks, this time we will use the prime quality ones, to produce the vertical side frame pieces for the windows
And then build the complete window units.

 Posted by at 6:00 pm
Jul 062019
 

With a lovely prospect of good weather ahead of us, we got on putting up the final rows, about 13 of them, of the tile battens to finish off preparing them for the slates. But before the slates could go on, there were plenty of other tasks to be performed. The next job was to nail up the flashing battens along the two hips and two ridges, using a string to guide us and keep us on the straight and narrow.
The other job we did was to put up the Skylight kerb flashing strip made of the aluminium metal sheets, with the rubber membrane to actually provide the diversion of the rain water.
After that, the metal mesh went on the gutters, fixed down as usual with the thin oak strips to clamp down the edge of the mesh and rubber membrane on the gutter.
Skipping over a 4 hour job in helping a friend out with a plumbing crisis, we continued in preparing the roof sections, this time in doing the special bull-nose upright flashing strips on the two hips and again the two ridges too. This was made up of the shaped wooden strips with the woven glass-fibre ribbon wrapped over the top of the bull nose, all sitting on the rubber membrane that will provide the protection against the rain water. We put on three coats of resin, the last layer being a grey flexible top-coat to finish it off nicely.

Whole of P and Q Roof Sections All Prepared, Flashing Layers Assembled and Ready to Slate!

O-P1-roofs-ready-to-slate

Whole of P and Q Roof Sections All Prepared, Flashing Layers Assembled and Ready to Slate!

Q-roof-ready-to-slate



This concludes the preparation work for these sections of the roof (the “N”, “O”, “P” and “Q”) and we can start slating .. .. but the last day of the week, the Saturday, was lost to rain but we worked inside in the workshop instead.

 Posted by at 6:00 pm
Jun 292019
 

We had a very disrupted week of work, losing three and a half days, due to other commitments and meetings. It is just one of those things that happens now and again.
We at least, got all the breathable membrane up on Monday and Tuesday so the “P” and “Q” sections of the roof are both now protected against rainwater, held down with a few vertical battens and some horizontal tile battens.

P and Q All Covered in Membrane and Almost Complete with Tile Battens

Membrane-on-P1-Q1

P and Q All Covered in Membrane and Almost Complete with Tile Battens

Membrane-on-Q2-P2



The final day, Saturday, we did a solid day of work of putting up all the rest of the counter battens, and got most of the tile battens nailed up too. We had to make a slight adjustment to some of the horizontal battens near the ridge line of the Q (the Conservatory) roof where the two “P” half sections meets together, there was a little 20mm mismatch to the lines of the battens so we “corrected” four lines of battens just below on the right hand side so there wasn’t a sudden “jump” in the line of the Slates.
P and Q All Covered in Membrane and Almost Complete with Tile Battens

Most-Tile-battens-on-P1

P and Q All Covered in Membrane and Almost Complete with Tile Battens

Most-tile-battens-on-P2-Q2



Next week, we hope that we will get in a full week of work and make solid progress on finishing the “N”, “O” and some of the “P” and “Q” roof sections, putting on thousands of Slates etc.!

 Posted by at 6:00 pm
Jun 222019
 

On Monday this week, taking advantage of the good weather, we proceeded to glass-fibre and resin the two complex junctions and the corner we installed last week. The two Downpipe Channels on either side of the Conservatory, designated P-Q1 and P-Q2, and the outer corner for the P and A roofs, the P-A corner.
These were rubbed down and smoothed off, removing bubbled up left-over glue etc. Next, the glass-fibre matting was cut up to fit the various surfaces and angles and then painted into place with the base resin layer. After rubbing that lot down smooth, the final top-coat black resin layer was applied and left to set overnight.

Continuing with P-Q roof and P-A Corner plus Progress on Oak Window Sills and Headers

Q1-downpipe-finished

Continuing with P-Q roof and P-A Corner plus Progress on Oak Window Sills and Headers

Q2-Downpipe-finished

Continuing with P-Q roof and P-A Corner plus Progress on Oak Window Sills and Headers

PA-corner-finished



The other little job was to complete building up the layers of the plywood strips for the P-A Hip line, up to the kerb.
Upon the next day, in the afternoon (the morning was spent doing an emergency repair in a friend’s bathroom shower unit), we tidied up the fibreglass-fibre coated junctions and also reconnected the drain pipes to the Downpipe Channels too, all before the rain arrived later on.

After that small job, we returned to the workshop to continue with the job of cutting the slope into the other set of Oak timber pieces, this time for the Headers (the top of the windows). We planed the 14 pieces including our prototype piece.

Continuing with P-Q roof and P-A Corner plus Progress on Oak Window Sills and Headers

Headers-sloped


Then everything was cleaned up and put away, we had finished with the planer for the time being and generally swept up the workshop.
The next several days, while we waited for the wet weather to go pass, we shaped the ends (both ends) of both the Sill and Headers so they will fit into the 13 window holes already in the house. We built two jigs to guide our circular saw to cut the various lines in a couple of directions, and produce the first step to make these complex shapes.
Continuing with P-Q roof and P-A Corner plus Progress on Oak Window Sills and Headers

End-shaping-jigs

Continuing with P-Q roof and P-A Corner plus Progress on Oak Window Sills and Headers

Sawing-end-of-sill-with-jigs



The saw cuts were manually finished off using an old-fashioned carpenters saw because it is made of a thicker metal to help slide into the pre-made slots. We also made use of the jigsaw to help.
Continuing with P-Q roof and P-A Corner plus Progress on Oak Window Sills and Headers

Small-window-sill-ends-cut

Continuing with P-Q roof and P-A Corner plus Progress on Oak Window Sills and Headers

Sills-and-Headers-with-ends-cut



The remainder of the week, Friday and Saturday, we got on with the task of applying the breathable and rubber membranes to the P and Q roofs and building up the counter and tile battens.
The first job was to install the rubber strips into the gutters, on the P roof (both the 1st and 2nd sections, either side of the conservatory) and used the double layer contact glue to stick down the rubber ends to the glass-fibre black surfaces. Then we glued remainder of the rubber that goes up the slope using the rubber glue, again allowing the two surfaces to dry a bit before carefully rolling the rubber membrane up the roof. We wanted to ensure that we don’t get rainwater slipping behind the rubber and into the gutters but on the wrong side (o boy!) as it will take a few days to get the whole P roof all covered in the breathable membrane and the chances are that we will get more rain!!
Continuing with P-Q roof and P-A Corner plus Progress on Oak Window Sills and Headers

P1-Gutter-lining-glued-in

Continuing with P-Q roof and P-A Corner plus Progress on Oak Window Sills and Headers

P2-Gutter-lining-glued



The last job of Friday, was to stick on the three layers plywood strips along the ridge line of the Q roof and also the outer edge too, all ready for the flashing slates (with its rubber under-skirt) to be applied.

For our last day of the week, we then got the two sets of valley counter battens that will support the glass-fibre trough installed, sitting on top of a metre wide breathable membrane. The two came together at the top, along with the ridge line. We put on excess lengths of battens, just in case we need it all when we sort out the complex arrangement of the main slates and the flashing slates meeting together and maintaining waterproofing etc.
The last task was to lay down the first row of the breathable membrane along the bottom, overlapping the rubber by 100mm and going over the hip and valley ends. This was secured down with the counter battens at each rafter position. We got the P1 section covered as well as both sides of the Q done too.

Continuing with P-Q roof and P-A Corner plus Progress on Oak Window Sills and Headers

P1-start-of-membrane-and-battens

Continuing with P-Q roof and P-A Corner plus Progress on Oak Window Sills and Headers

Q2-Valley-and-start-of-membrane


 Posted by at 6:00 pm
Jun 152019
 

The last two days of the week (Friday and Saturday) were nice days so we got on with installing the two Downpipe Channel modules for the P-Q valley that forms part of the extension part of the building for the Conservatory coming in the future.

Then we got all the guttering done, for all the P (first section and second section either side of the Q conservatory) and the first third of the A section along the front of the house.

Finally, we got the layers of the plywood strips installed for the p-A Hip corner of the roof so we could fibre glass all the complicated junctions and corners.

Gutters and Downpipe Channels Installed for all P and Q and the first Third of A.

Gutter-on-P1

Gutters and Downpipe Channels Installed for all P and Q and the first Third of A.

Gutter-and-hip-on-P2-and-start-of-A



So on Monday (weather permitting) we can fibre-glass these junctions and have them all sealed, ready for the rubber membrane to go on along the two P small sections.

 Posted by at 6:00 pm
Jun 152019
 

Because of the changeable and very wet weather we had this week, we decided to switch over to our backup plan and work on our Windows and sort out the Oak Timber for the framework.
We got 13 windows (9 large, 3 medium and 1 small), each having a Sill and a Header plus a octagon shaped “pillar” vertically on each side, made from three different Oak timber sizes. For this week, we worked on the Sill and Header pieces, using 50mm thick Oak timber planks. We pulled out from storage all those planks that were wider than 160mm. The Sills will need to be 175mm deep and the Headers 145mm deep.

Making Oak Window Frames Started

30-pieces-of-Oak-for-window-sills-and-headers


We found 30 planks in all and we have rejected four of them for being too warped or twisted down the length. We may have to use one or two of these rejects if we find ourselves running out.
The next job was to slice a straight edge to establish a base line to work from. We had to use a standard mobile circular saw to get a deep enough blade depth as our Oak timber were, in some cases, deeper than 50mm. The track saw we had, which would have been ideal for this job, could only cut about 48mm thick.
Making Oak Window Frames Started

One-edge-straitened


The next task was to pass all the pieces through the big circular saw module in our workbench. We selected 12 pieces for the wider 178mm set and another 12 for the smaller 153mm set plus one left over which we cut in half (for our single narrow window), one each for the two sets. Initially, we had to cut very slowly as the equipment was prone to overheating and the safety protection breaker kept tripping. Also the blade was getting hot too and leaving scorch marks on the Oak. We decided to change the blade to a branded and pleasantly discovered that it started cutting much more cleanly, a little bit faster and no heating at all!! Just shows you that one should really change the original blade that came with the machine to a more professional branded blade!!

After all that fuss, we got our planer equipment out, plus our two extension tables and proceeded to plane one flat side of all the 26 planks plus two spare “test” pieces for prototyping the complicated shapes later on.
After careful analysis at this half way point, we then earmarked which plank would go for the Large windows (9 of these), another 3 for the medium windows and the odd one for the narrow window. We also flipped around each piece to find the best edge for the nicest visual presentation too.
The next stage of operation is to convert the planer machine into thickener mode (we put away the long two extension tables) and got out four roller support stands and using a long straight aluminium bar to adjust the heights of the rollers (we had to do this every time we adjusted the thickener to plane off more material) and got all 28 pieces planed down to a general 46mm thickness. The finished surfaces were not perfect because we knew that much of the “bad” parts will disappear when we cut the slope in, and also there are sections that will be cut away to develop the outer wings of the sill and headers.

Making Oak Window Frames Started

Ready-for-slope-cutting


The final job for this week (day 4 of wet rainy weather, we measured that we had 23mm of rain in that time!!) was to build a angled support jig that will guide our oak planks through the planer and cut the slope on them.
Making Oak Window Frames Started

Planing-the-slope-on-the-sills


We managed to do all the wider 173mm Sill timber pieces.
Making Oak Window Frames Started

Sills-finished-planing-1

Making Oak Window Frames Started

Sills-finished-planing-2


We stopped here because the weather changed for the better and we could get on with outside tasks.
When we get wet weather again, we will continue with the job of cutting the slope into the narrower set (the headers) and then cut the fancy shaped ends and round off the edges etc.

 Posted by at 2:04 pm
Jun 082019
 

On Monday, we extended the existing Gable section of the roof that will form part of the Conservatory. Using the new stud walls built last week, we put up a 420mm extension to the ridge beam to make a sum total of 910mm (3feet). This new ridge was sandwiched between two layers of our structural 12mm plywood, glued and screwed together with a second full single length of 95mm by 45mm treated timber underneath to reinforce the extension.

Gable Roof Extended, Two Downpipe Channels Created and Resumed Preparing the P Section of Roof

Extension-of-Q-ridge


Then a couple of CLS 63mm timber pieces were fixed to the long diagonal rafters to provide support for the new roof boards and two fresh lengths of 4by2 timber cut to form the outer rafters of the new extended roof.
The narrow strip was covered with more 12mm plywood segments and it is now ready for the next stage of counter battens and the breathable membrane to be put up.
Gable Roof Extended, Two Downpipe Channels Created and Resumed Preparing the P Section of Roof

Extended-Q-roof


Tuesday through to Saturday morning was spent working on two new Downpipe Channels to connect to the gutters and to the future Conservatory. We carefully measured each position of each channel module (PQ-1 and PQ-2) and then pulled out a couple of planks of Oak timber, 27mm thick but one plank being 150mm wide and the other being 250mm wide. We also had a couple of left-over pieces already planed from a previous job. These forms the two sides and the wider bottom pieces of the channel module.
All was planed and cut to width.
Gable Roof Extended, Two Downpipe Channels Created and Resumed Preparing the P Section of Roof

Start-of-Q-Downpipe-Channels


The next job was to put on the tongue & groove edges to join the pieces together and using a PU glue, formed a very strong joint and a much more robust module. The two sides were shaped in a particular fashion so they will slide in and under the overhanging roof boards of the “Q” conservatory roof.
Gable Roof Extended, Two Downpipe Channels Created and Resumed Preparing the P Section of Roof

Q-Downpipe-Channels-Glued


Another gluing job was to stick on two layers of 12mm plywood squares (150mm across) and stick them under the modules in the position where the plastic drain pipe will come through. After they had set, we drilled a 114mm diameter hole through all the layers (22mm of Oak and the two layers of the 12mm plywood) and then glued in short lengths of drain pipe.
Gable Roof Extended, Two Downpipe Channels Created and Resumed Preparing the P Section of Roof

Q-Downpipe-Channels-with-Pipes-fitted


While that was drying and curing, we went outside to resume work on putting up Slates on the narrow diagonal strip to finish off on the “N” section of the roof. We got half way up by the end of the day.
Gable Roof Extended, Two Downpipe Channels Created and Resumed Preparing the P Section of Roof

N-Nearly-done


On the following day, we carried on working on the downpipe channels by cleaning up all the edges, especially the newly installed plastic pipe sticking through the bottom of the channels and then applied a coat of polyester resin and glass-fibre matting to fully waterproof these channels and provide a smooth surface for the rainwater to flow into the pipework. And finally on Saturday morning, we applied the black coloured top coat layer of resin to provide the slick surface and colour.
Gable Roof Extended, Two Downpipe Channels Created and Resumed Preparing the P Section of Roof

Q-Downpipe-Channels-ready-for-fitting


While that was hardening, we brought in all the thin OSB strips that has a “bull-nose” on one edge. We discovered from the first time we used these strips to form a flashing waterproof barrier for the Hip and Ridge lines, that the resin soaked into the open grain of the material so we spent a hour or so applying Polyfilla to all of them to bulk fill these gaps.
Gable Roof Extended, Two Downpipe Channels Created and Resumed Preparing the P Section of Roof

Bullnose-Strips-filled


We are in the middle of some very changeable and windy weather at the moment so we hope we can still proceed with our work. We have been lucky so far this year in general. Next week, we will install the new downpipe channels, put on the guttering and then start laying on the strips of roofing membranes all along “P” and the “Q” roof sections.

 Posted by at 6:00 pm
Jun 012019
 

For the rest of the week, from Wednesday lunch time to Saturday (with some interruptions), we got all the platform modules moved around to the next section of the house to work on. These modules have been up for about a year now, but at last we have moved them to now cover the roof sections, O, P and A plus a bit of N we haven’t quite finished yet.
There are 11 modules originally, we made another one and brought into service our old mobile platform (which is similar to two modules). They are all 8feet by 4feet in size and we butted them up together, going around corners and anchoring them together and to the house too, to make it very stable. Sometimes, we had to space some modules apart and we filled in the gap with more CLS timber and plywood boards.
Another safety feature was to mount a kick edging strip right around the outer edge of the total platform walkways and working area.

Platform-on-NO

Platform-on-NO

Platforms-on-P-A

Platforms-on-P-A



Finally, we moved our hoist system around to the beginning, near the Loke side of the house, and got it connected to the platform.
Materials-hoist-moved-to-he-front

Materials-hoist-moved-to-he-front

Next week, we will start work on extending out the Gable roof section of the conservatory and have that ready for the continuation of slating the roof.

 Posted by at 6:00 pm
May 292019
 

We resumed work on building up the stubby stud walls, on the newly formed concrete block work and foundations, in order to help support the upcoming extension to the Gable Roof sticking out the “P” section of the roof (over the Great Room).
The new stud walls are 900mm wide and we used our nominal 2″ by 4″ preservative treated timber to put together a framework that bolted onto the 140mm wide concrete blocks and reaching up to the eves. It is attached up the full height to a post added to the inside of the main house.

Framework-for-Q-walls

Framework-for-Q-walls

Attached-to-extra-post-inside

Attached-to-extra-post-inside



We put on two layers of sheet material on the outside, the first one being 12mm plywood which we glued and nailed directly onto the framework and then the second layer was a sheet of 12mm thick cement board to provide the weather proofing and we glued around the edges with more PU glue and then nailed with plenty of nails to provide a strong solid racking to support and brace the main building and conservatory both.
Completed-Q-walls

Completed-Q-walls


We finished by lunch time Wednesday and the next job is to make the downpipe channels using our Oak timber to form the interface to our guttering system, but before then we have to move all the scaffold platform modules.

 Posted by at 1:00 pm