shaun

Aug 282020
 

The task we did next, was to measure every window again, using a framing square and precisely get all the data that describes the state of our framework, with all the wobbles and skews! All this went into a spreadsheet and analysed all the numbers. We have concluded a final set of sizes for all 12 windows as follows ..

A.Great Room 1640mm by 1598mm
A.Kitchen 1640mm by 1598mm
C.Entertainment 1640mm by 1598mm
F.Utility 1030mm by 1598mm
H.Bedroom 3 1640mm by 1598mm
I.Bedroom 3 830mm by 1598mm
K.Bedroom 2 1640mm by 1598mm
M.Bedroom 1 1640mm by 1598mm
N.Great Room 1030mm by 1598mm
O.Great Room 1640mm by 1598mm
P1.Great Room 1640mm by 1598mm
P2.Great Room 1640mm by 1598mm

 

We managed to arrive at a fairly consistent size, by making adjustments to the clearance gaps between the glass and the framework and having slightly different thickness for the pads that the glass will be sitting on. We are having to make our plastic pads ourselves on our 3D printer because our glazing units are tripled glazed and they are 50mm thick, three 6mm panes and 16mm warm bridge spacers. Even if we could have bought them somewhere, our window sills had the slope starting only 40mm from the back edge, which means the plastic pads needs to get thicker at the front. So we will use our supply of ABS plastic strand (we first doubled checked the structural strength of this type of plastic and discovered that it is way strong enough!), design and print a 55mm wide by 100mm long pads with it getting thicker after 40mm from the back.
And finally, the glass will be stuck firmly on to the aluminium bars using double sided security tape which is 3mm thick by 12mm wide.

We placed the order for the glass today at a cost of about £5000 (To buy 12 oak windows would cost at least £12000).

 Posted by at 4:00 pm
Aug 262020
 

These last five days have seen the creation of the Oak Beading strips that will hold the triple glazing units into the window frames.
The beads are held in place by clips are specially designed to grip the timber piece without having to use screws or nails and making a very neat finishing covers around the edge of the glass.

Window bottom cross section

Window bottom cross section


This means that the Oak strips needed lots of steps to produce the required slots and gaps, using our router. But before that, we had to make a collection of planed strips ready for that complex task. We took all our prime oak timber out of storage, 2metres planks at 29mm thick and widths from 100mm to 150mm. We swopped one or two of them when we discovered that they were a bit too wobbly.

Then, using the similar process we used before, we slice a straight edge using our Track saw, and then pass each plank through our table saw to make a pile of 33mm wide by 29mm pieces. We produced 56 of them, eight more than what we required.
The planer machine and its two long support tables were assembled and we proceeded to plane all the strips on two edges to get them clean. Then through the thickener stage to end up with smooth finished battens measuring 25mm by 27mm.

Now we are ready to use the Router to remove wood material in various ways, using various router bits (three of them!) in a total of seven passes through the machine to achieve our neat and hopefully elegant beadings.
We used up a fair number of test pieces, trying different techniques and different styles before settling on the final method and final finish we like the look of.

Oak Beading Created

Window-beads-Router-setup

Beading Routing order

Beading Routing order



1 The front visually exposed surfaces had a 22.5 degree angles sliced off
2 Then the top was removed to create a gentle slope down and a slope up, to meet in the middle
3 The narrow slot for holding the rubber glazing seals was cut using a very fine 2.3mm wide blade, going 5mm deep.
4 Another fine slot, again a 2.3mm wide but 9mm deep this time.
5 Then an area 12mm high and 2.5mm deep was removed. This is part of the plastic clip, the vertical part.
6 Finally, the bottom gap was created, a 19mm wide by 5mm deep removed off the bottom of the oak strips, done in two passes.

It was a very fiddly job to do, but with lots of patience, with lots of help from using clamped on oak strips and springy fingers, to guide each of the 56 pieces through the machine, we got there in the end.

Oak Beading Created

Window-beads-Finished

Oak Beading Created

Window-beads-Detail



We are now ready to order the glass! See next report!

 Posted by at 6:00 pm
Aug 202020
 

Following the initial progress we made on sorting out the Oak timber last Saturday, we resumed to produce the Octagon Covers for our seven inside corners to hide the plastic downpipes plus the special cover to hide the downpipe just right of the Side Door.
All the steps and methods were essentially the same as last week’s work on the nine outer corners, apart from the edges didn’t need the 45degree slopes.

The Last 8 Oak Covers Created and Installed

Internal-Corner-pieces-ready-to-install


The installation process, on the other hand, was different this time, because every corner is slightly different and we had to custom fit each one. The procedure was to put up the octagon cover into place and then measure the gap between the surface of the oak to the plywood support strip inside. Every corner is slightly different so we had to slice off a variable amount each time using our battery circular saw, following a drawn line along the long edge.
The Last 8 Oak Covers Created and Installed

Cutom-fitting-a-corner


Then we marked off a regular set of screw holes approximately every 200mm. Four of these holes were the real ones with full clearance, and the other ones just had pilot holes to grip the screw in place as there is nothing behind the oak.
None of the eight pieces had their height adjusted so we got that one correct!
The Last 8 Oak Covers Created and Installed

The-MN-Corner-before-covering

The Last 8 Oak Covers Created and Installed

The-MN-Corner-after-covering



So that concludes the task of covering all the corners with the ends of the Larch cladding and the pipework, all 17 of them! Phew!
The Last 8 Oak Covers Created and Installed

Some-completed-cladding

 Posted by at 6:00 pm
Aug 142020
 

The last 9 days or so have been spent on processing a pile of Oak timber pieces and generating nine finished covers to hide the cut ends of the Larch cladding.
The rough oak planks were 3metres long, 29mm thick and a range of various widths from 100mm to 180mm. We wanted to end up with 27 planks, split into 2 sets of 90mm and 110mm widths and all at least 2800mm long (the longest length going up a corner).
The first job was to ‘straighten’ each planks by slicing one edge using our track mains powered circular saw. This removed any wobbles and bends. Then after that, using the main table bench circular saw this time, and using the 2.4 metre fence to guide and control the width, we sliced these 27 planks into the 2 sets we needed.
So the next task was to set up the planer with its two input and output support tables, rigged up to our high air flow rate vacuum system to draw away the shavings and then proceeded to smooth off one side of all the planks. We do multi passes on each planks until we judge that there is enough of the surface planed to ensure that it will work reliably during the thicknesser stage. It is a compromise because we may find ‘more’ room to plane the other side and achieve at least one completely smooth finish. Any rough spots can be left hidden on the inner side of these Corner Covers.
As mentioned already, the second stage of the planing process was the thicknesser, and we worked our way through all the planks, flipping some over to remove more of the rough spots and eventually, we finished up with 18 smooth 110mm wide pieces and 9 90mm wide pieces.
Now after tidying away that machine, we brought out the table bench saw again, this time with the saw blade set to an angle of 45degrees and sliced the 18 planks (the 110mm wide set) to end up with one edge with a slope and a flat face of 90mm wide. This now matches up with the other set of 90mm planks.

Parts-for-the-outside-corner-covers-Planed-and-Sawn

Parts-for-the-outside-corner-covers-Planed-and-Sawn


The next piece of machinery to come into play, is our router with the special 22.5° tongue and groove cutter bits, to create the joints to allow us to lock together the three planks (2 of the 110mm wide ones, fitted on to the 90mm middle piece) and form the half the octagon Corner Covers. We sorted out all the planks, checking for maximum length of finished surfaces and arranged 9 sets of three planks. We then knew which edge to cut and in the proper order. The last quick router task was to trim a small quarter rounded edge along the sharp 45degree slope to avoid future splinters and cracking.
Parts-for-the-outside-corner-covers-Joints-made

Parts-for-the-outside-corner-covers-Joints-made


The final sawing job is to slice little angled off both ends of each plank, the bottom ends (nearest the slates) had a 30degree angle and the top ends had a 45degree slope. But the precise length of each set of the three planks had to be measured from the real world (we walked around our house and measured all nine corners and wrote down the numbers.
Oak Covers Created for Nine Outside Corners

Sample-Outside-coner-section


At last, we could, and did, stick together each set (using Polyurethane glue) for the joint and we used lots of duct tape to pull together the tongue and groove joints and held the shape tight while the glue cured.
Oak Covers Created for Nine Outside Corners

Piles-of-glued-up-Corners-1

Oak Covers Created for Nine Outside Corners

Piles-of-glued-up-Corners-2



Then it was time to install them! Hurray!
We started with the six easiest corners and thought we would tackle the nearest corner (the ‘OP’ one) to the Great Room which is where we are working these days, but only to discover that the wall along the ‘O’ section does a funny little wiggle at the bottom. The batten that holds up the Larch cladding had been bent outwards by the concrete blocks, without us spotting it. This meant that the Oak Cover has a large increasing gap between the Larch planks and the Cover piece (the Oak being nice and straight of course!). After skipping that corner to do the opposite corner, the ‘NO’ corner, which turned out to be much closer and even, we decided that we would make adjustments to the Larch cladding planks, rather than living with the gaping ‘hole’. So we undid the screws and pushed in ever increasing thicknesses of plastic spacers behind each Larch plank and then retighten the screws back down again. We use a long spirit level as our straight edge to achieve the proper and correct adjustment.
Oak Covers Created for Nine Outside Corners

Straigtening-the-OP-Corner-1

Oak Covers Created for Nine Outside Corners

Straigtening-the-OP-Corner-2



With this done, we now can go and make lots of wooden spacers to go behind the Oak Covers to allow plenty of air to circulate and keep everything dry and clean, to avoid any potential wet rot etc.
We decided to buy round wooden poles, and found a set of Eucalyptus broom handles on the web, an inch in diameter and about 1.5metres long. We got our drill press machine out and rigged up a little holder to hold short lengths of the round rods, and drilled a centralised clearance hole down the middle. We then slice the rod up into lots of 5mm thick discs, thus made our spacers with a predrilled hole, ready for going between the Oak and the Larch and screwed down.
Now the next task was to find an old waste length of oak strip and mark off distances of 200mm up the length and guide us to try and keep an regular spacing for the fixing screws. But before that, we snapped together a metal placement template for the drilling of the clearance holes in the Oak, positioning the template on the 45degree slope and get consisted alignment up all the Corner Covers.
So the procedure for putting up these Covers, was to drill the first clearance holes at the bottom, 75mm off and then screw it on to the corner. Then using the marked guide stick, drilled clearance holes at approximately every 200mm, only making adjustments to ensure that the fixing screw sinks into solid portions of the Larch timber. Then taking the Cover piece down again, taking it indoors and glue on our little wooden discs using 5 minute PU glue. While that was curing, we took out the next corner to repeat the process of doing the clearance holes. After that, the Oak Cover piece would go back outside to lay on a set of trestle tables and proceeded to get a thorough coating of the timber oil treatment, on both sides but most especially the hidden interior side. While that was soaking in and dripping excess off, we got on with the third corner in doing the clearance holes. Eventually, the oil had soaked in enough for us to handle it and actually install the first corner piece which we did!!
Oak Covers Created for Nine Outside Corners

Corner-with-spacers-attached

Oak Covers Created for Nine Outside Corners

The-Staight-OP-Corner



As you can imagine, this logical collection of programmed steps was repeated several times over until we got all nine corners done.
Oak Covers Created for Nine Outside Corners

The-AP-Corner-cover


The last three corners, two on the Front Porch and one on the Side Porch, had a little adjustments made to the tops of their covers, to allow us to go around the main support beam sticking out the house, and for the Side Porch, an additional adjustment to clear the diagonal metal bracing arm too.
Oak Covers Created for Nine Outside Corners

Shaun-tightening-the-last-screw

Oak Covers Created for Nine Outside Corners

The-EH-Corner



This is the complete process of taking rough sawn oak timber and ended up with nine finished Oak Covers, all in about 9 days. Not Bad!
Now we repeat the whole process over again, but this time, for the Inside corners, to cover up the plastic downpipes plus our odd one in the middle of the ‘H’ wall. But that is another story and next week’s work!! Actually, We have already started the process and we have got out all the 2.6metres oak timber pieces and sliced them up into the required 26 planks, and even got most of the planing done too! More in Next week’s blog report!

 Posted by at 6:00 pm
Aug 012020
 

The last couple of days was spent replacing a simple low power electric spur from the Garage to the main House with a higher powered circuit. We pulled through three twenty five square millimetres fat wires to provide a low resistance connection. It is not directly “plumbed” straight into the main consumer unit in the garage, just a short high powered cable and plugged into an high current round pin socket.

Upgraded Electricity Supply to House to Allow High Power Tools

Upgraded-House-supply-32A-Plug

Upgraded Electricity Supply to House to Allow High Power Tools

Upgraded-House-supply-Connection-from-Large-wires-to-Plug



We left plenty of extra wire at the house end then connected them to a small consumer unit which has a main switch and two circuit breakers.
The House now has two main points for mains electricity connections, at both ends of the house, in the Great Room where we will be setting up our work bench, table saw, planer and vacuum system and the other point in the Utility Room to run our domestic equipment plus a reel extension cable ready to go outside when needed.
Upgraded Electricity Supply to House to Allow High Power Tools

Upgraded-House-supply-Temporary-distribution-box


One of the other jobs we will need to do is to connect our compressed air supply and seal off the various outlets that are waiting for an appropriate socket mounted on them and then we can have the ability to have nail gun capabilities without having to run a hose from the compressor in the garage and across our driveway.

 Posted by at 6:00 pm
Jul 292020
 

We Have Done It! The whole house is now fully clad with our Larch timber!
It took only a day and a half to finish off the last bit, the “L”, “M” and “N” sections, our alcove, around the back of the house. We could cut most of the wood in one go then it was quick too put up.

All Walls Done At Last! L, M and N Sections Completes the Cladding Job!

Most-of-the-wood-for-the-Alcove


We used a higher scorch level for these planks to see what it is like and also to capture more heat in the cooler seasons. If we don’t like it, we can scrub the surfaces with a wire brush to tone down the darker colours, and of course, reapply the fire retardant treatment again.
All Walls Done At Last! L, M and N Sections Completes the Cladding Job!

The-finished-LMN-Alcove


The final job was to unscrew the top 6 rows of timber on the very first section we did a month ago, and we painted the exposed “pink” battens black. We realised that one could see up between the planks and see the lighter colour and hence we had painted all the other battens around the house, except for the “P1” section next to our patio area and Conservatory.
Then, we moved all the excess timber to our long term storage area, the swimming lane, sorted into width. Both sets of treated Larch planks are now all together, ready for the time when we will clad the garage.
All Walls Done At Last! L, M and N Sections Completes the Cladding Job!

The-left-over-Fire-Treated-larch-1

All Walls Done At Last! L, M and N Sections Completes the Cladding Job!

The-left-over-Fire-Treated-larch-2

All Walls Done At Last! L, M and N Sections Completes the Cladding Job!

All-the-spare-larch-stored



The rest of the week was spent tidying up inside the house and upgrading the electric feed from the garage to the house to provide a more heavy duty service (we only had an 13A extension lead before). We will want to use more powerful machines now that we are going to be working inside the building.

 Posted by at 1:00 pm
Jul 252020
 

By Monday lunch time, we had finished off the last triangular piece of the wall above the Utility’s window and door, the gable wall of the Porch.

Big Complex H wall Now Complete Plus I, J, K and O all Done Too!

H-Gable-is-finished


We then moved all the platforms and equipment around to the back of the house to start working our way along seven remaining sections to be clad in the fire-treated Larch timber.
By Tuesday, we had finished the “I” wall section but we had to divert our effort to replace the caterpillar tracks on our mini-digger, see Replaced Caterpillar Tracks on mini Digger
Big Complex H wall Now Complete Plus I, J, K and O all Done Too!

I-Compete


We got back to work, Wednesday afternoon without any further interruptions (including missing all the rain on Saturday!) and zoomed along to get the “J”, “K” and “O” walls all finished and everything. We even managed to get the first row on the three walls that makes up our neat little alcove, the “L”, “M” and “N” sections. We also put up the marks on each battens that tells us where to put each larch timber piece going up the wall.
Big Complex H wall Now Complete Plus I, J, K and O all Done Too!

J-finished

Big Complex H wall Now Complete Plus I, J, K and O all Done Too!

K-Finished

Big Complex H wall Now Complete Plus I, J, K and O all Done Too!

O-fully-clad

Big Complex H wall Now Complete Plus I, J, K and O all Done Too!

Base-row-on-LM-N



Hopefully, next week on Monday and Wednesday, we will get the Alcove all finished and that will be it!

 Posted by at 6:00 pm
Jul 222020
 

We discovered a couple of days ago, at the weekend, that one of the caterpillar tracks had split and ripped half way across. We can see rusty steel wires sticking out of the rubber material.

Replaced Caterpillar Tracks on mini Digger

The-tear-in-the-old-track


The mini digger has been idle for several years and we think the whole machine has been slowly sinking into the sandy dirty soil every time we had heavy rain showers. This probably meant that the tracks had been “under water” for longer periods of time and there must have been a initial split in the rubber material to allow the water access to the tensile steel wires that runs around the circumference of the track and converted the high carbon steel into iron oxide!
So we ordered a pair of new rubber belts online and they came yesterday (Tuesday), amazing considering that we only placed the order at the beginning of the week!! Wow!
All very clean, very black and smelling of strong rubber.
Replaced Caterpillar Tracks on mini Digger

The-new-tracks


After we had completed putting up the Larch cladding on the “I” section of the house, in the late afternoon of Tuesday, we came over with our pressure washer and jet blasted all the lower portion of the digger to remove as much as possible the sand and dirt in and around the caterpillar tracks and cog wheels. We also gave the cabin a quick blast to see if the dirt and green algae would come off and it does seem so. We were wondering whether to give it a fresh coat of paint!
Replaced Caterpillar Tracks on mini Digger

A-very-dirty-digger-1

Replaced Caterpillar Tracks on mini Digger

A-very-dirty-digger-2



So on Wednesday, the big day, of taking off the old tracks and sliding on the new ones! These belts are very very heavy! There are 76 rubber coated heavy steel metal bars (one inch diameter with heavy flanges sticking up to ensure positive engagement with the drive cog wheel), spaced apart by 52.5mm, the track being 300mm wide and the tread depth of 20mm deep. We estimated that the weight of one of these track is about 100kg each!!

The first job was to push the whole digger over to lift one track entirely off the ground and then open up the cover to access the static hydraulic ram that lies inside the structure that holds the caterpillar track. There is one screwed in plug that has a grease nipple point in the middle. We undid the plug to allow the grease to escape when we thump the end of the track in. we used a sledge hammer to knock the ram backwards, this in turn ejects a small blob of grease.

Replaced Caterpillar Tracks on mini Digger

Grease-comes-out-like-a-pile-of-


The distance between the two internal “cog” wheels at each end, is shortened by about 25mm and that is enough for the rubber track to slip off (with a bit of an assistance by lowering the digger down to flatten the track and extend its length), to disengage off the front wheel (the non-drive non-sprocket wheel) and we could then drag the old track away.
After inspecting the various parts, most especially the main front wheel and three smaller solid metal wheels, to make sure that they weren’t loose and still easy to move, which they were very nicely smooth and tight.

Next, is to drag into place the new tracks and sort of hook it on the back cog wheel and lay the rubber track out alongside the digger and lowering down the digger again, to extend the length just enough to squeeze it over the front wheel using a crow bar. Then the hard work starts .. by pumping grease back into the static hydraulic ram to push the front wheel back out to its fully extended position to tighten the track up. The instructions says that the droop in the track underneath the middle small cog wheel should be about 2cm so it is not too tight and not too loose.
Our grease gun is a manually operated device, using a pumping handle and it was awkward in trying to get the gun’s outlet to engage to the nipple on the digger and put  thousands of PSI pressure to force the ram outwards and tighten the track.

Replaced Caterpillar Tracks on mini Digger

All-new-and-shiny-1

Replaced Caterpillar Tracks on mini Digger

All-new-and-shiny-2



We repeated the whole exercise for the other track and just before lunch time, we got both changed over and we now have a fully working mini-digger again.

The final job after lunch was to make sure that all the joints all over the digger was fully charged with grease. The log book was updated with today’s work and the last entry was back in 2016!! The old tracks were folded in half and carted around to the back behind the temporary living quarters for storage and we will decide to what to do with them later on. We even may use them as a raised flower beds!!

 Posted by at 6:00 pm
Jul 182020
 

We started the new week by moving the remaining oiled standard planks to storage in the swimming lane.

Cladding Second Stage - The Fire Treated Larch Timber for the Back of the House

Oiled-Untreated-planks-stored-in-Swimming-lane


Then we started processing our second set of Larch timber that had been dunked in the Fire Resistant treatment a couple of weeks ago. The first job was to remove all the iron stains that we accidentally put on during the dunking process. We had applied the Oxalic acid to each and every stain and then later washed them with fresh clean water to remove as much of the acid solution (which had turned the surface yellow – this fades slowly away).
Cladding Second Stage - The Fire Treated Larch Timber for the Back of the House

Planks-after-Acid-treatment

Cladding Second Stage - The Fire Treated Larch Timber for the Back of the House

Then-cleans-and-sorted-by-Size-and-Scorch



But also we decided that we would drain and dismantle our dunking tank assembly. We don’t need it anymore, so we recovered about 35litres of the oil, the second bottle is more “coloured” but the first one is looking quite clean.
Cladding Second Stage - The Fire Treated Larch Timber for the Back of the House

Deconstructed-dunking-tank


Then we got on with the task of mounting planks on to the walls, which we started where we left off, on the “H” wall (the right side of the house going alongside the Garage).
But we also suddenly remembered that we needed to paint the top of the battens black so anyone looking up the wall, and up the gap between planks, cannot see the “pink” colour, just darkness.
Cladding Second Stage - The Fire Treated Larch Timber for the Back of the House

We-started-on-the-H-wall

Cladding Second Stage - The Fire Treated Larch Timber for the Back of the House

then-remembered-we-needed-to-paint-the-front-of-the-battenms-black



The “H” section of the house includes the Side Door Porch, which is being held up with reinforcing diagonal arms, attached about six feet up the wall. This means that some of the planks had to have notches cut out to fit around these aluminium arms.
We got the second half of the “H” wall all finished, right up to the rafters, and we got as far as the first couple of rows going up inside the Porch’s gable wall section over the Utility Room window and the Side door. It was quite fiddly working around the projecting wooden beams that holds the Porch roof up, including the more awkward process of moving around on the platform and avoiding the metal arms too. We had to keep coming down to cut our planks and slice the lap joints etc. so it was a bit slower in putting up the pieces.
Cladding Second Stage - The Fire Treated Larch Timber for the Back of the House

then-we-got-to-the-top-of-the-windows-on-Thursday

Cladding Second Stage - The Fire Treated Larch Timber for the Back of the House

and-most-of-the-rest-done-by-the-end-of-the-week



Next week, we should get the last remaining triangle section finished and then we can move around to work along the back of the house. We might even get that done by the end of the week 😉

 Posted by at 6:00 pm
Jul 112020
 

Upon the resumption of the new week, we got on with the task of cladding the Front Porch wall, the “C” section that has the main house door and Entertainment Room’s window. It is over 7 metres long and disappears up to the apex of the porch roof, some 5 metres high.
By the end of Monday, we got all the lower section of the wall covered in our Larch cladding timber, with different randomised planks on each side of the door and the window.

Then over the next three days, using our existing high level platforms (we had to raise a shorter one by extending it’s legs by temporarily clamping on a set of the old tall legs), we slowly covered the rest of the wall. It was cramped at times, especially near the top, working around all the piles of timber, ladders and tools, it was a tricky and slow work.

Front Porch Wall is Clad plus also Walls D and E too

C-Wall-Platforms-to-work-on-gable-wall

Front Porch Wall is Clad plus also Walls D and E too

C-Wall-Day-2

Front Porch Wall is Clad plus also Walls D and E too

C-Wall-Day-3

Front Porch Wall is Clad plus also Walls D and E too

C-wall-Day-4



These cladding planks are the original finish (no burnt surfaces, apart from the gentle band of colour at the bottom and tops of the windows and doors), we had to go all over the surface, wiping the dust and finger prints off. Sometimes, a bit more effort and the use of some sand paper was require, to bring back the clean look again.
Front Porch Wall is Clad plus also Walls D and E too

C-Wall-Finished

Front Porch Wall is Clad plus also Walls D and E too

C-Wall-Finished-2



After that, we tidied away the three platforms and then continued on the next and last two wall sections, “D” and “E” to finish off all the walls that make up the “front” of the building that don’t need the fire-treated timber. We were looking at the finished C porch wall and decided that the darker band running underneath and over the windows should be toned down. We therefore proceeded to unscrew the high scorched planks off the “A” wall to scrub them more vigorously and put them back.
Front Porch Wall is Clad plus also Walls D and E too

Dark-planks-Before-Scrubbing

Front Porch Wall is Clad plus also Walls D and E too

Dark-planks-After-Scrubbing



Following this new thinking, we also decided to only use scorch level “2” and level “3” to form a narrower band on the “D” and “E” walls, to make the darker bands less of a statement.
Front Porch Wall is Clad plus also Walls D and E too

D-Wall-Complete

Cladding on C,D & E

Cladding on C,D & E



This concludes the work on the first half of putting up the Larch timber on our walls. The next job is to sort out our second set of timber, remove the rusty iron marks, scrub the darker scorched planks to tone those down and then dunk all of them into the oil bath. That would be next week’s list of jobs to do.

 Posted by at 6:00 pm